Australia’s National Colours: Green, Gold and More

If you’ve been to Australia, you might notice the colours green and gold stand out quite a bit around the country.

That’s because green and gold are regarded as the national colours of Australia. Both colours arguably symbolise what it means to be uniquely Australia and Australian on different levels.

Green and gold, the colours of Australia.

Green and gold, the colours of Australia.

There are a few reasons behind how green and gold came to be the colours of this country, and these reasons are tied with history and events of today.

For a long time there were no official national colours in Australia. Historically blue, gold and green were commonly used to represent the nation. It wasn’t until 19 April 1984 that green and gold were formally recognised as our national colours, formally proclaimed by then Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen on advice from then-Prime Minister Bob Hawke.

Green and gold has long been associated with Australia’s national sporting achievements and competitions. Australia’s cricket team, the Socceroos, the Matildas and really most Australian sporting teams don green and gold uniforms when they play international matches. Our cricket team was the very first national sporting team to wear the colours– namely in the form of the baggy green (dark green cricket cap) during the Ashes tour of England in 1899.

Green and gold are relatively bright colours, and it’s not hard to spot to these colours on players on field during a match. Similarly it’s not hard to spot the typical Aussie fan and cheer squads in the stands; many Aussie sporting spectators are not shy of wearing green and gold as they cheer on Australia at sporting events. There’s the Green and Gold Army: Australia’s premier football support network supporting our soccer teams playing abroad, organising tours traveling alongside these teams with green and gold tour scarves, hats and other memorabilia.

Australian sporting tops.

Australian sporting tops.

It’s not hard to find Aussie cheer squad merchandise at souvenir shops in Australia. Think green and gold jerseys, tank tops, banners, flags, scarves, capes, towels, umbrellas and more. The other day I was wandering around a souvenir shop in the city and noticed one such green and yellow polo shirts cost around $15-30 per piece – and the more you buy, the better the price. To be honest these shirts seemed great in terms of quality, not thin and not see-through…but with bright colours that looked ready to run in the wash.

More specifically, the colours green and gold are symbolic of Aussie sporting pride and entertainment, symbolic of national pride and togetherness through friendly rivalry, and what some might call ‘mateship’.

Green and gold is also associated with the golden wattle, Australia’s floral emblem. Also known as the acacia pycnantha, the plant is a shrub around 6-8 metres tall with dense clusters of yellow flowers and is native to south-eastern parts of Australia. It’s a flower is capable of withstanding the harsh Australian weather in the face of droughts and winds. Around the time of Federation in 1901, there was heightened interest in the Australian environment. The Wattle Club in Victoria held Wattle Day demonstrations each September to encourage recognition of the flower as a mark of patriotism.

The golden wattle was formally proclaimed the national emblem at Australia’s bicentenary on 19 August 1988. The golden wattle, and in turn green and gold, is symbolic of patriotism, resilience and unity of the people of Australia.

Canola fields.

Canola fields.

Think of green and gold, think of Australia’s abundant natural surroundings. There’s Australia’s blazing sun. Abundance of beaches and sand. Lush lawns and grass across wineries. Eucalyptus trees and over 92 million acres of eucalyptus forest and bushlands. Over the years, I’ve spent time roaming many an Aussie beach, tanned (and baked and burnt) under many summer suns, trekked through grassland alongside kangaroos, danced on grass and fell down and rolled on that grass…

Consequently, the mineral gold makes up a significant part of Australia’s history. In the 1800s, gold mines were discovered and this led to a series of gold rushes around Australia. The promise of gold attracted locals and migrants to relocate to these prosperous areas. A green and gold Australia: a visually stunning abundant place, riches right below Aussie soil, the lucky country for some.

Green and gold are two colours synonymous with a number of Australia’s flags and official symbols, colours arguably part of the nation’s identity. There’s the Golden Wattle Flag which was designed to represent strength and unity of Australia. The Boxing Kangaroo Flag is displayed and paraded at Australian sporting events, considered our sporting flag’ so to speak. The Bicentennial Flag comprises a yellow outline of Australia against a green backdrop, and both the Christmas Island and Cocos Island flags bear similar colours.

Flag of Australia

Flag of Australia

A lot of the time national flags correspond to a country’s national colours. That’s not the case with Australia, and there has been talk the colour blue could be our national colour too. Australia’s national flag is blue, red and white: based on the Blue Ensign with the British Union Jack. The Australian Aboriginal flag is made up of the colours black, red and yellow. Up until the 1984 proclamation, there was debate on whether Australia’s national colours should be a combination of blue, green and gold. After all, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms prominently features gold and a bit of blue. The Order of Australia medals awarded to Australians who demonstrate meticulous service are medals primarily of gold and blue. In addition, the Australian passport is a navy blue colour.

One can argue Australia probably did away with blue as a national colour as this colour has ties with British ensigns. Perhaps not much of a surprise given Australia broke away from British settlement and every now and then there are proposals about incorporating green and gold (alongside doing away with the Southern Cross) into a redesigned Aussie flag. Flags, symbols and colours are not just represent our shared values, but at times also our political associations and allegiances too – playing upon sensitivities which we often don’t see eye to eye with.

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In Australia it’s common to see local retailers cashing in on the green and gold to market and sell what they have to offer. Colour is essentially branding and power, and a study on brand and identity showed that choice of colour can increase brand recognition by up to 80%. Australian food chains, grocery chains and the tourism sector commonly adopt green and gold as part of their campaigns. Time and time again KFC turns green and gold to support Aussie cricket in the summer: some KFC stores were painted green and gold in 2013-2014 and in 2017 there was the HCG Buckethead Army campaign where gold and camo-coloured KFC buckets were sold in store. The Sunshine Coast ran a tourism campaign during the 2018 Commonwealth Games enticing tourists to swap ‘gold’ for ‘green’ – that is, enticing tourists to enjoy the state’s greener pastures such as the beaches, lush hinterland and local food scenes.

The other day I was walking down the potato chip aisle at Woolworths and saw packets of limited edition Snag and Sauce flavoured potato chips. The potato chip packets were green and gold, probably in the spirit of Australia Day which is just around the corner. Also, the other day a friend of mine in Malaysia showed me a tin of Milo he bought – on the tin was the green and gold Australian Made logo, and my friend wondered if this Milo was better than the made-in-Malaysia Milo.

Milo.

Milo.

Thus, green and gold are arguably colours emotionally tied to many Australians. They are colours you may see a bit more every day here, maybe more when you grocery shop or looking for your next best travel destination around Australia. They are colours that symbolise proud, distinctive Aussie character and values, proudly and uniquely Australian.

Green and gold were colours I actually remember quite clearly growing up. When I was five and went to pre-school, the school uniform at my school was either a green and gold checkered dress or a yellow top and green pants. Though in (international) high school my class was allowed to wear jeans every day, I had friends from other (state) schools wearing green or blue coloured uniforms.

Back then as a kid in pre-school, I didn’t have an issue with my green and gold school uniform. I did note it was a rather bright coloured uniform in contrast to the plain white blouse and navy blue skirt uniform I wore for primary school in Singapore. In Australia, each school outlines its uniform code; uniform colours might be chosen according to a school logo’s colours (my pre-school’s logo just so happened to be green and gold), and these days school uniforms are designed to make students feel like that they belong.

Uluru art.

Uluru art.

Notably, there are Australian state colours. That is, different states in Australia formally associate with different colours when it comes to representing themselves, and certain colours have become associated with certain states through popular use. For instance, Victoria’s colour is navy (maybe black as well since many Melbournians like wearing black clothes), NSW’s is blue and white and Queensland is maroon – colours which are commony seen during sporting games between states. While green and gold might symbolise who Australians are on a national and global scale, state colours are colours that might mean a closer connection to home.

At the end of the day, colours are what we see all around us. They might touch us emotionally, and certain colours might bring us closer to certain people and places.

What colours do you associate with Australia?

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200 thoughts on “Australia’s National Colours: Green, Gold and More

  1. Nice piece as usual Mabel 😊. Colours and flags can certainly bring out strong differences of opinion in Australia. Personally, I don’t mind what goes on with the flag or colours, but if I were t pick colours that I associate with Australia, they would be blue, green and ochre. Blue for the sea, green for our beautiful forests and ochre for our magnificent outback. Maybe red, because it is so hot here today 😂. Stay warm Mabel 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    • Glad you enjoyed this piece, Andy. Thank you so much 🙂 You are so right there. Colours and flags go hand-in-hand, and so rather closely aligned with the political realm. I like the suggestion of ochre as a notable colour. The outback is certainly a big part of Australia. Loving the warmth this summer is bringing, and hope it is not too warm for you. Stay cool, Andy 😊

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  2. I loved reading this post Mabel. The mention of the golden wattle reminds me of a favourite bit of sketch comedy from Monty Python’s Flying Circus. The golden wattle is as Australian as the name Bruce 😃

    I’m guessing it’s a function of age and place of birth, but green and gold aren’t as important to me as maroon. I mean as a kid I’d love watching the Kangaroos in green and the Wallabies in Gold, but the thing that got me intensely emotional was seeing the Queensland Maroons take the field. I’ve always been a supporter of states rights and while federation was a good thing, I don’t think enough Australians appreciate the sovereignty of states and the constitutional responsibilities the Australian Government has when compared with states and territories. I’ve said many times, Queenslander first and foremost.

    It saddens me as I think of the post Ponting era, the baggy green doesn’t seem to hold the same value anymore. Since Clarke was captain, I’ve lost interest in cricket. Before Ponting, the captain of Australia’s first 11 had the status on par with the Prime Minister of the day. Sadly Clarke and company have ruined that.

    As we approach the quesation of what we should do about 26 January, my position has changed. The matter of Australia Day while not the subject of your post is a consideration because on Australia Day and the days leading up to it, we see the green and colours more pronounced in marketing and we see people wearing those colours more dominantly as well as people using the Australian flag for clothing. I’d be happy to see the public holiday associated with 26 January removed from the gazette of public holidays. I’d like to see 1 January recognised as the dawn of our federation. I’d like the third Friday of January recognised as the Australian version of thanksgiving and reconciliation. That day should be gazetted a public holiday. A day to ponder our past including our relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, and a day to indulge in Australian fare. Whatever Australian fare may be for people. For some it will be lamb. For others it may be a bit of roo cooked sous vide and served with some gravy flavoured with lemon Myrtle and a salad covered with Australian finger lime caviar. For those people who wish to celebrate the landing of the first fleet and the declaration of the colony by Captain Arthur Phillip, they can take a recreation leave day to celebrate but it shouldn’t be a public holiday.

    Anyway, enough from me. Great post Mabel 😃👍🇦🇺

    Liked by 1 person

    • I like your third Friday of January idea Gaz! That would be brilliant and take all the pressure off that usually and unfortunately builds on the scheduled 26 Jan… I’d vote for that idea. MMmmm! Im just imagining some of the different food festivals that would be around on that 3rd Friday… great idea Chef 🙂

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    • Completely forgot about the wattle and Australia reference in Monty Python. That series is a classic 😃

      Sounds like you sure love your Queensland, Gaz. State rights are just as important as your rights as an Australian citizen. In fact, state rights are the rights that probably affect your day-to-day life more. I forsee you support the Queensland Maroons for many more years to come.

      Not much a follower of cricket. But I did watch it for a bit when Ponting was captain, and the baggy green did catch my eye.

      Australia Day, and the meaning behind it, is always an interesting topic of discussion. Whenever there’s a post about Australia (not just on my blog but anywhere), you could always tie it to Australia Day. So true that we see green and gold more in the lead up to this day, and as you alluded to, it seems these colours are just as important as parading the Australian flag about this time of the year.

      The holidays you proposed there sound interesting, and takes into consideration the significant events of our nation and recognising the First Peoples as the owners of this land, apart from the landing of the First Fleet. As Australia, it’s important to recognise there are a number of significant events in history that make us what we are today.

      Great comment, Gaz. Thank you so much.

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  3. Interesting info on the significance of green, gold and blue in relation to the Australian flag. In fact. all your pieces in various facets of Australia and its culture make for engaging reads. Colours and combinations thereof on flags are indicative of a country’s history and consitution. In the case of India, we have the tricolour of saffron, white and green in our national flag. In The top band is of Saffron colour, indicating the strength and courage of the country. The white middle band indicates peace and truth with Dharma Chakra, the eternal Dharmic wheel. The last band is green in colour shows the fertility, growth and auspiciousness of the land.

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  4. Mh I never really paid attention to such things but when I think about it also realize certain color patterns in Germany and Finland.
    Now as I am a specialist when it comes to chips in both countries I can for certain say that the colours of the packages are different. Whileas in Germany the local brands use often redish clours with some yellow in it they use in Finland more blue colurs with yellow! (German flag black, red and gold while the Finnish flag is blue and white)
    Ofcourse global chips such as Pringles do not count into it as they use worldwide similar colours due to brand recognition.
    Yes yes I am a nerd when it comes to chips it seems 😮

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    • You really do sound like a chip nerd specialist, Timo. Something to be very proud of, and you must have eaten your fair share of chips over the years 😀 Maybe Germany and Finland really want to try the best possible tactics through marketing their chips (and I hope the chips taste good). Ah, Pringles. It is probably one of the few chip brands known worldwide. Pringles also reminds me of the Mr Potato potato chips as they are similar in terms of packaging (tube) and branding (potato head).

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  5. Mabel, you do choose the most interesting topics to write about! And yes! When we visited Australia (a couple of years ago now, is it?), I did notice a shift in the palette from Hawaii, for sure, but also from other places I have traveled in the world. It’s so curious to note how colors seem to define a place, even if subconsciously. The colors of high noon over Sydney Harbor, the glinting ocean contrasting with man-made bridges and buildings; the Opera House, of course, seeming to take flight; the flying foxes soaring over The Rocks as night closes in, the spreading sunset in the distance … Lovely.

    Thanks for another great glimpse into your life Downunder. Blessings in this New Year! It feels energized and direct the chaotic pushme/pullyou of 2018! Aloha ❤

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    • Sounds like your Australia trip is very memorable to you, Bela. Sydney seemed to greet you with a visual of colours and sunshine. From your photos, I see Hawaii as such a colourful place, much more so than Australia – from the forests to the hills to the beaches to the every day streets around you.

      Wishing you a wonderful year ahead, Bela. Here’s hoping for a good 2019 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hoping the same for you, Mabel! Feels good so far 😉 I find light is unique anywhere I go. The light in Ireland different from Australia. Oregon/Washington different from Maine. And on and on. Hawaii is unique due to the subtropical climate and altitude/microclimate diversity. It is its own purely unique place. Hope you get here one day! Aloha ❤ ❤ ❤

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        • Fascinating to hear you find light unique anywhere you go…which can determine the colours you perceive (for instance it has been argued black is not a colour…). Some might think it’s brighter in Australia because the sun shines stronger over here (lack of ozone layer). Maybe I will make my way to Hawaii one day and see the colours it is made up of. Aloha right back to you, Bela ❤

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  6. Enjoyed reading this post, Mabel. I think I have seen the use of green, gold and sometimes yellow in Australian sport uniforms but I never really thought much of it, so it was good to make sense of those through your blog post. Green and gold are a great combination! Not too many countries can boast of such a lively and colorful combination as their national colors. From what I see around the globe it’s the red, blue and white that are the national colors of every other country. Australia really sounds amazing! I really hope I can do a roadtrip in Australia one day. I think I’d love it as I just love beaches and dry landscapes. Happy New Year, Mabel!

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    • Thanks, Pooja. I also think green and gold are a great combination – the way Australia adopts the colours, they don’t seem to clash. Interesting observation there, that red, blue and white are commonly recognised colours in many countries. Maybe one day you will get to do a massive roadtrip of Australia and see it for what it is. Happy New Year to you too 🙂

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  7. Beautifully written my friend! I definitely associate green and gold with Australia. In high school my sporting house was green so we would dress up in our colours when a swimming or athletic carnival was on. Milk brings back so much nostalgia haha! Miss you my friend, come by anytime!! Xxoo

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  8. I had no idea! I suppose if I’d thought about it, I’d have guessed the flag colors, but the green and gold are just perfect to reflect the resources and nature in Australia. (I’m obviously not too attuned to Aussie sports, or I might have noticed this earlier!)

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  9. Hello Mabel,
    Thank you for this thoughtful and insightful post! It was really fascinating to learn more about the meaning behind these national colours. I hope 2019 is off to a great start, and wishing you a wonderful year ahead 🙂

    Best wishes,
    Takami

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  10. Hello Mabel,
    Thank you for this thoughtful and insightful post! It was really fascinating to learn more about the meaning behind these national colours. I hope 2019 is off to a great start, and wishing you a wonderful year ahead 🙂
    Best wishes,
    Takami

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  11. Interesting. You must be awarded for being the best blogger writing on the most innovative topic. I’m always happy to read your post, Mabel. Something new to look forward to, every time!

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  12. Looking at the green and gold here in the US, I tend to think of the company, John Deere [https://www.deere.com/en/index.html] that markets and services equipment for farms and landscaping. Now I’m wondering if the founder of the company was originally from Australia.

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    • Had a look at John Deere and it does have green and yellow (or gold) all over it. Quite apt farming colous – green for nature and harvest, yellow for sun and perhaps harvest such as wheat.

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    • That is so true. Green and gold do come out the Australian Open, especially on show by the Aussie cheer squad. Have fun watching the Open this year. Always a great time of the year 🙂 🙂 🙂

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    • There’s so much to learn about Australia. Some have said ochre is a good colour to associate with Australia’s outback too. Also maybe blue for the blue skies we so often get here 🙂

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  13. I had absolutely no idea Australia’s national colours are green and gold. I was going to ask how come those two colours are not in the flag but you already explained it, hehe.

    With Australia I associate an earthy red colour, because of Uluru I guess.

    China and Spain’s national colours are the same: red and yellow, like their flags.

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    • The Australian flag design and colours were adopted through a competition way back (the final design changed a bit).

      It seems quite a lot of people around the world know Uluru. Then again, I’ve met some people who have never heard of Uluru and think Australia is just about beaches XD

      Haha, what a coincident China and Spain share the same national colours!

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  14. I must admit as much as I love nature, green is not a personal favorite Mabel. I really think more of the blue and red for Australia. Maybe because I think of us as having close friendship between our countries, I like our having similar colors 😊

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  15. Mabel, I really felt close to the portion of this article where you talked about green and gold being colors of the country itself, of the environment; even though I haven’t had a chance to visit Australia, the movies and photographs I’ve seen are always suggested wide open spaces, lots of golden hills and plains (or brown if drought-season), green of trees and Great Barrier Reef water, and in general sunny warm climate, though I’m sure there is more variability there in the country, also being its own continent. !

    When you described the country’s flag being blue, with red and white colors, it reminded me that my daughter (a history buff and someone who works with textiles) mentioned that blue is an old dye that was more stable than other dyes back in historic times. I think she mentioned she’d read that was why so many historic flags use the same colors, especially in Europe. I just tried to find a quick reference via the Internet for this fact, but did not see anything that popped up in a cursory search. 🙂

    Green and gold. Really intriguingly bright colors, eh? I loved that you noticed them in commercial products in shops. Thanks for a fun article!

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    • You have some astute observations about Australia from what you have seen around, and lovely to hear you are familiar with the Great Barrier Reef. Australia does have an expansive outback and some other bloggers mentioned ochre would be a good colour to describe Australia too – and that exists besides the more urban areas and the golden beaches and seas.

      Your daughter sounds like she has a very interesting line of work with textiles. Quite an intriguing connection between blue being a stable dye and was more likely to be chosen as flag colours. Maybe it was a word-of-mouth tip and here you are, hearing about it 🙂

      It really is common to see green and gold in the grocery shops here in Australia. You just have to look a little more closely.

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  16. Mabel it never dawned on me that the colours of a country would be different than the colours of the flag of that same country. When we were in Australia we purchased Australian cycling jerseys as a souvenir and let me tell you they are a blinding yellow. Great to be seen while on the road. No green trim though just black lettering. Now I feel a bit bad that there isn’t a splash of green. I would have associated blue with Australia with all of that gorgeous ocean to be honest.
    Fascinating post Mabel. I’m off to check if Canada has official colours and if they are different from the flag.

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    • I laughed when you said you bought a blinding yellow Australian cycling jersey. Perfect for you, keeping you safe on the roads. Hopefully lasts many years to come. I’ve actually seen quite a few cyclists here don the blinding yellow as they cycle on the roads. Smart choice 😀

      I’ve always thought red and white were Canada’s colours. Maybe brown for all the redwood forests and maple syrup you have too 🙂

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  17. Very interesting, Mabel. I would have thought dark blue for Australia and a hint of red. I guess based on the flag. I visited Melbourne and honestly didn’t see a lot of black clothing. I saw a great variety of school uniforms as many schools were on field trips to museums and downtown Melbourne for their end of school year. I thought the uniforms were wonderful. I love the sports enthusiasm there, too. Great post!

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    • Maybe when you visited Melbourne decided to show its colours to you 😀 There’s certainly a lot of enthusiasm for sport here, both local and international sport. Many do associate Australia with blue – for its blue skies and blue waters all round especially in the summer. Thanks for stopping by, Lisa 🙂

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  18. As a long time cricket fan the colours of the Aussie team are well known to me – other sporting colours pass me by 🙂 This is an interesting and informative article about the Australian colours. I don’t think we are nearly as nationalistically themed as you guys – we don’t seem to have much of a theme going at all – there’s only so much you can do with black 🙂

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  19. Really enjoyed learning about green and gold here, Mabel. As a birder, one of the things I love about Australia’s birds are all the bright colored birds. I’m also an American fan of the Green Packers, so that was the first thing I thought of when I started reading. Great post.

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    • Thanks, Jet. Australian birds are indeed bright coloured birds. We have quite a few species of colourful parrots 🙂 Green Packers, the football team. That made me think of the Boston Celtics in NBA, a green team 🙂

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  20. Mabel, the research you put into this post is applause worth! 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼 Just everything you wrote about I honestly did not know. My “eye” tends to be attracted to yellows/golds in the Natural World so I know how they tend to “stick” out. Your writing as usual is faultless! Really great post!! Thank you! 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

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  21. Your national colours of green and gold certainly stand proud Mabel. And no more so in your Olympic events as the proud team come out in their colours.

    I loved reading the history behind these colours and learning more about the Golden Wattle flower.

    I noted that you said even your school uniform was made up of Australia’s colours, I guess ours too here in the UK were based on the Union Jack colours, I had a red berry hat, red and white stripe tie and navy skirt and cardigan with white blouse. Our summer uniform red and white checked gingham..

    Loved the photos too Mabel.. And I always associate your bright green and gold with Australia,

    Both colours energising and vibrant, which I think Australia generates for many people wishing to make a new start in the world.

    I have had several friends and people I know emigrate to your great country, seeing it as a land of opportunity.

    Love to you Mabel, and wishing you a lovely weekend..
    Sue ❤

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    • Ah, that’s right. The Olympics is another place where you see Australia donning the green and gold. very noticeable during the opening ceremony parade.

      So interesting to know that some school uniforms in the UK are based on the Union Jack. Never was aware of that. It really sounded like a very red-and white themed uniform you had in school. Likewise here in Australia we also have summer and not-so-summer school uniform 😀

      I like how you associate the vividness of green and gold as welcoming a new start. So apt. Hope your friends and those you know have found home in Australia, and many memories to be remembered in this country.

      Lovely weekend to you, Sue. Take care ❤

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  23. This is interesting to learn about Australia. I do enjoy learning about other cultures. Here in America, the colors Green & gold bring to mind an American football team from the state of Wisconsin.

    Your photos are wonderful. I especially love that photo of the canola fields. The contrast of not only the gold and yellow, but the blue sky and white clouds are just lovely.

    Thank you for stopping by my blog.

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  24. Mabel, a comprehensive and fascinating study about the colours that symbolise Australia. I always think of the gold and green, and when seeing the flag I jolted to and yes, realised this is its national flag! From the opposite side of the planet I read about the debate within Australia about its ties to the U.K., whether to totally breakaway. I’m impressed how the colours of gold & green are seen so widely, even in the food department! As for uniforms, here in England there are uniforms of all colours, if you’re lucky it’s on the blue scale which looks good on most people. Purple is not so good! A great article and interesting to learn more about Australia! Hope you’re having a great week, Mabel and that it’s not too hot (news about the heatwave sounds frightening!)

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    • Thanks, Annika. Green and gold are colours so widely recognised as Australia’s national colours, but they aren’t on the flag of Australia. There is a lot of debate hear about breaking away from its ties to the UK – and I do wonder what the UK’s sentiments are on that.

      Blue does look good on most people (so interesting). As for purple, I know some people who don’t like that colour for what it represents. It has been hot in here in Melbourne, 44’C/111’F. I don’t mind the heat so long as I keep cool and everyone is safe 🙂

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      • Mabel, I hadn’t thought about purple representing anything in particular … don’t know if this is more of a southern thing?

        Yikes! 44 degrees centigrade is so hot! When we have 38 or so in summer we all struggle, but there again air-conditioning is non-existent. One day in July I nearly tried to clamber into the fridge I was just TOO hot! Safe and cool sounds just the ticket! 😀

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        • Purple has been associated with royalty, but also with freedom of sexual expression and expression of self in general – and so some might not warm towards purple (I know some people who don’t in Australia). I’m all up for purple, but I guess each to their own.

          I heard it can get quite humid in the UK. Humidity and 38’C would be quite the warm combination! Hopefully you don’t get too many days like those. Meanwhile I am going to enjoy these warm days as comfortably as I can 😀

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  25. I’ve never been to Australia and didn’t know about the symbolism of green and gold there. It’s a fascinating bit of history you’ve written here. I can see how adding green and gold to your national flag would make sense. Like other commenters have said when I think of green and gold in the USA I think of the Packers football team. But obviously where you are green and gold mean a lot more than one sports team.

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    • It is a very Aussie thing to recognise green and gold as our national colours. Yes, some others have mentioned the Packers, and from watching some American sport I’ve seen other teams don green/gold/yellow too (like the Boston Celtics). Maybe one day you will get to visit Australia, Ally 🙂

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  26. I liked learning about the green and gold and love the history and natural connection to the colors – great nature photo too
    And so is the Australian-made Milo better?
    Lastly – looking forward to reading up on the color connections to branding and power-

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  27. Canada doesn’t have a national flower. They tried…but not official. There have been official provincial flowers for many decades:

    For Ontario it’s the trillium flower. It is wild and shouldn’t be trampled in the woods.
    Alberta is the wild rose, It is also wild.

    British Columbia is the Pacific dogwood flower. Wild and only grows in that province.. etc.

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      • The maple tree (there are several different types of maple trees in Canada), is common in areas of Canada where there are lots of deciduous trees..all of eastern Canada, Ontario. But not in the prairie provinces nor along the Pacific coast.

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  28. I admit I hadn’t heard of the golden wattle before reading your post, Mabel! When I think of Australia I actually don’t have a color that comes to mind. But now I know so much more, including that green and gold are the ones to watch for on sports gear and souvenirs there 🙂 Here in Canada we are red and white for color. I love when there’s a Canadian event to see the sea of red with white accents – it’s very cool! I wish you a wonderful weekend 🙂

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    • Don’t think the golden wattle is well known outside of Australia. It sounds like Canada’s colours are the colours of its flags, which I think some of us are familiar with 🙂 I’ll look out for Canada in red and white during sporting events next time. I hope you have a good week ahead 🙂

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  29. Mabel, I always learn so much from your articles. I like how you tied in elements of history in this one. We are a product of our history and knowing these facts helps me to understand the culture.
    You photos are always fabulous but the on titled, Uluru art, is exceptional.
    Make it a great day,
    Ali

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    • You are very kind, Ali. Thank you so much for your nice words 🙂 We are all indeed a product of our history and together, we live the present and move towards the future. I really like the Uluru art too. The artist who painted it did a very good job of capturing so many colours about it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Hi Mabel, I’m a bit late getting here to comment on your Colours of Australia post and to wish you a happy Australia Day. But I had to make it here in time to wish you a happy Chinese New Year. We have Chinese friends staying with us at the moment and had a delicious Chinese meal, cooked at home, to celebrate the Lunar New Years Eve.
    I wish you a wonderful year. I believe the Year of the Pig could be a good one for everyone. Enjoy!

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  31. An interesting read and it seems green and gold were adopted popularly before they became legislated. They are vibrant colours but difficult to make into formal uniforms, if you remember the usual fuss every time our Olympic uniform is released.

    Having been to Central Australia a few times, the Aboriginal flag colours do seem more representative of Australia. I guess there will always be a debate.

    Like

    • True, there always seems to be a fuss around our Olympic Uniforms, even the cricket team too. Maybe too green, too yellow, or as you said, difficult to make. There will probably always be debate about the flag of Australia. Maybe it will change one day.

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  32. Super interesting post Mabel. There were some items that really caught my interest because growing up in South Africa I literally survived my childhood by drinking MILO every single day! It was my all time favorite “food”! And then, because South Africa was originally a British colony, we had Woolworths as well, it was a very popular store then, I don’t know now. But I do believe it is owned by the British Marks and Spencer. I think South Africa also has green and gold as official country colors and certainly on the flag and rugby teams.

    Peta

    Liked by 1 person

    • You drank Milo every day during your childhood! It really must be a drink you loved back then, and maybe today still as well 🙂 Now that you mention it, when I think of South Africa and sport, I think of the Springboks – and their jerseys are green and gold 🙂

      Like

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