8 Simple Ways To Feng Shui Your Home

If you want to feel connected to where you live, you might want to cultivate good feng shui at home.

Practicing the art of feng shui can help attract positive energy and create a more balanced atmosphere at home. When you feel good vibes at home, chances are you’ll feel better about your life.

Practicing Feng Shui is about finding balance | Lens-Artists Challenge #12 - Path.

Practicing Feng Shui is about finding balance | Lens-Artists Challenge #12 – Path.

When you feel better about your home and life, chances are your everyday life will attract wealth, peace and prosperity.

Feng shui might seem overwhelming at first. But look closer and you’ll see feng shui is about creating a happier and healthier environment. Its principles are founded upon symbolic interior design rules and basic home organisation arrangement.

Pronounced foong shway, feng shui translates to wind (fēng, 风) and water (shuǐ, 水). Having been around since 9BC, it is aligned with the Five Elements of Chinese culture: wood, earth, fire, metal and water. A central theme of feng shui is chi (qi, 氣), encouraging positive flow of energy to create harmony and balance within spaces through design.

China is known to have developed the feng shui compass, the Luo Pan (luó pán, 羅盤). Legend has it around 25 BC the Luo Pan was presented to the Yellow Emperor Huang Di to assist in a heroic battle against evil wizards. Philosophers Lao Tzu and Confucius based their philosophies on feng shui. The Great Wall of China was designed with feng shui in mind and its curved wall symbolises favourable moving chi.

My Chinese-Malaysian parents have always lived by the traditional Chinese mentality and championed feng shui. For them, rooms and furniture have to be laid out a certain way.

Over the years, I’ve learnt there are meaningful reasons behind this behaviour. Notably, feng shui is more than just decluttering Marie-Kondo-style, more than minimalism and conscious mindfulness of our surroundings.

Maybe you’re wanting to redecorate your place or are looking at buying a house. Here are some easy ways to incorporate feng shui to feel more contented at home.

Quite a few of us are familiar with Feng Shui.

Quite a few of us are familiar with Feng Shui.

1. Choose the right location

Cultivate good feng shui by choosing a favourable area to live in. Where your home is located can affect the energy flowing through it.

For instance, a house located on the inside of a curved road or with the front door facing an oncoming T-junction is considered bad feng shui. Incoming vehicles directed towards your place is reminiscent of a collision course and symbolises ‘poison-arrow’ energy (shā qì, 煞).

Avoid living beside a dumpster or busy road. Some believe these locations cause you stress or you’ll constantly be at a cross roads with ‘blocked energy’.

Many Chinese property buyers in Melbourne prefer places with a good view on higher floors: facing a swimming pool or the sea, facing water symbolises wealth. Many also avoid living on the fourth floor as the number four is considered unlucky.

Certain directions bring around certain energies.

Certain directions bring around certain energies.

2. Keep a spacious front entrance

Keep your entrance area spacious to attract positive energy. If the front door is directly aligned with the back door, place a shelf or potted plant halfway to break up the straight line. This prevents chi coming in the front door from flowing directly out the back door, instead circulating chi through your home.

It’s desirable to have the front door open up to an open space as opposed right into a bedroom, kitchen or bathroom. This directs energy flow to all corners of the home instead of chi dominating a certain room.

During the Lunar New Year, many Chinese tidy their entrance and leave the front door open to usher in prosperity. An open door signifies invitation, welcoming guests and camaraderie. Personally, I keep my front door locked at all times because I don’t want to get robbed. Instead I open the window during festive and summer seasons.

3. Have a supportive bed

Place your bed in the ‘command position’ so as to have a good view of your room, enhancing your inner chi, control and life vision. The door should be within your line of sight when you’re in bed.

Avoid having the foot of the bed directly facing the door as chi can run too powerfully towards the middle of the bed and cause diseases. Try not to have mirrors facing your bed as they reflect light and energy around the room, causing restlessness and perhaps attracting infidelity.

Also avoid placing the bed directly under a window as pollutants and outside noise can disrupt your sleep. Instead, make sure your bed has a solid headboard and leaning against a wall that isn’t adjacent to the toilet.

In Chinese culture, good feng shui and sleep support metaphorically equates to sleeping against a solid mountain that has got your back.

Running water equates to energy flowing through and through.

Running water equates to energy flowing through and through.

4. Invest in water

As one of the Five Elements, water is symbolic of abundance, wealth and nourishment. Drinkable water is a vital commodity in China where water is scarce in some areas.

Consider getting a water feature in your home. You could set up an outdoor pond with koi fishes and a waterfall in your front yard.

Alternatively you could get an indoor decorative water fountain for your desk or hallway – with water flowing inwards and not facing the door. Having running water around not only adds incoming wealth but also prosperity.

5. Get some plants

Plants are symbolic of abundance and continuous growth. They radiate harmonious energy simply by being living things.

Liven up your home with indoor plants such as bamboo plants or money plants. Also known as epipremnum aureum or Devil’s Ivy, they are easy to care for and represent luck. For a pop of colour, perhaps bring home some cherry blossom stalks which are believed to bring good health.

Think twice about getting spiky plants like cacti. These plants are generally considered bad feng shui, bringing about nervous energy. On the flipside cacti can be seen as resonating protective energy.

A touch of growth with the presence of greenery.

A touch of growth with the presence of greenery.

6. Choose a balanced colour scheme

In feng shui, colour correlates with the Five Elements in Chinese culture. Notably:

  • Red (fire) corresponds to energy and simulation.
  • Yellow (fire) is linked to power and patience.
  • Black (metal) represents career.
  • Grey (metal) signifies helpful people.
  • Brown (wood) is about stability.
  • Green (wood) symbolises health and wealth.
  • Blue (water) illustrates career and wisdom.

It’s common in Chinese homes to colour code each room according to geographic direction. For instance, painting the East-facing wall and having wood furniture in the living room activates the wood element.

To counter inauspicious chi, try painting your walls a lighter colour such as a light cream or grey shade. These shades are favourable for the bedroom and bathroom, encouraging you to rejuvenate and counter negative chi from waste water.

You might also want to choose colours from each element group when decorating your living room. This helps create a sense of balanced well-being and improved mood. For instance you could have a light grey couch with peach-coloured pillows – attracting kindness and luck while making your room colour-coordinated.

7. Clear clutter

Clutter at home adds up to negative chi. This can lead to stuck energy or blocked energy from fear and pessimism of being careless with your possessions.

Declutter your home and clear out unwanted items to feel refreshed again. Downsize your closet that is bursting at the seams. Pick up knick-knacks scattered on the floor. Empty overflowing trash bins. Sweep your floors. Wash your bedsheets.

While I’m not a minimalist, I like my place organised and tidy. Putting things away and seeing a clean, well-arranged space makes me feel more comfortable at home.

With space and light comes a sense of openness and possibilities.

With space and light comes a sense of openness and possibilities.

8. Let in light

Pull up your blinds and curtains. Let natural lighting and sunshine stream through your windows. Add mirrors around your home to reflect light and make rooms appear bigger.

Light is associated with the fire element and is symbolic of stimulating warmth and energy. The brighter our home, the more inviting it will seem. After all, our eyes are drawn to light and ambient lighting stimulates conversation.

Part of me likes the blinds down and not exposing my home to the world. Another part of me also likes pulling back the blinds on warm summer evenings, letting that sunset come through the windows.

*  *  *

There are different approaches to feng shui. Some might believe in Chinese philosophy and turn to feng shui consultants to get the most out of their homes. Others might view feng shui from a more Western-inclined mindset, focusing on arranging spaces based on architectural aesthetics.

Neuroscience and architectural research by sociologist Dr John Zeisel suggests man-made environments affects your mind and that in turn effects how you respond to your surroundings. It’s interesting to note the common differences in the design of gardens: many Western gardens lean towards square layouts and showcase artificial man-made beauty, while classical Chinese gardens tend to be more softly curved in layout, imitating nature as much as possible.

Each of us interpret Feng Shui on our own terms.

Each of us interpret Feng Shui on our own terms.

Does feng shui actually work? Few studies have been done on the effectiveness of feng shui. A study in 2017 by Auckland University of Technology looked at the relationship between feng shui and hotel success. The study found two accommodation properties with poorest feng shui ratings had the weakest success ratings in terms of occupancy and profit.

At the end of the day, your home is your most personal space. Make your space your own based on what you like and what makes you tick. There’s nothing like making your home yours and feeling connected to it – a space where you can simply be yourself.

Do you practice feng shui?

219 thoughts on “8 Simple Ways To Feng Shui Your Home

  1. Love this post! I learnt so much my friend! I always remember from Feng Shui that a bed should face the door. That has always stuck in my mind. I love the idea of incorporating the elements to create good energy. Lots of light, plants and water! That sounds like an ideal place to live. Also yay to the Mr Wobbles reference! We miss you, hope you’re well xx

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you so much my friend! The bed facing the door is something to keep in mind, facing but not directly in line with the door XD Nothing like a home where you feel connected to everything around you. Miss you too my friend! Hope to see you very soon ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I heard about the door alignment (and that back and front should not be directly aligned – and also heard that if the stairs are right there by the front door – that is not good – and our home has neither of these)
    I like how you noted that you lock your door – and whew – good wisdom.
    We keep our door locked and I actually used to harp on my boys to make sure dead bolts were always secured –
    but sometimes during the day (not when the AC is on) the front door is open and the storm door (all glass) is all that is there and you know what – I do light up when I see that open door. Like if I have pulled up from being gone – and now I see it is related to this Feng Shui theory and an open door is “welcoming guests as much as welcoming camaraderie and energy.”
    PS love the bird anding picture – it’s like the one in the water is in sync with him (likely why you chose it for this post)

    Liked by 2 people

    • That is right about the stairs. If the stairs are right beside the door, it can be seen as obstructing energy flowing through the house, or energy rushing upwards.

      Ooooh. Your doors have dead bolts too and very wise of you to harp to your boys to make good use of them. I used to live in houses where there was one dead bold at the top and one at the bottom of doors for added measure…and then there was a padlocked grilled gate (something like a storm door) outside the door for even more added security.

      It is good that your storm door is glass and let’s light in to light up your place. Like a window to the world, and a window for the world to come in.

      The bird picture…the first photo you mean…that was a lucky shot XD

      Liked by 1 person

  3. My Chinese-American in-laws marveled over how well our house conformed to Feng Shui principles — water feature, the right numbers, not facing the T-junction, front and back door not aligned, bamboo plant indoors, bed in the right place in the bedroom, etc.

    I planned none of it. So was it luck, or does the human mind naturally seek a certain order for defensive purposes? For example, it only makes evolutionary sense sense to place your bed where you can view an attack coming from doors or windows, right? It your house faces a T-intersection and someone forgets to hit the brakes, they’ll plow through your front door. Having water on your property means you can survive a drought or a siege.

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    • Wow. That house you got in the school zone does sound like the perfect Feng Shui house lol. Maybe it’s a reason why your in-laws want to visit…

      I think you are right about the unconscious mind on the first two. Makes logical sense. As for having water on your property, too much of it, poor drainage or poor ventilation can cause water to accumulate within the concrete and that causes mould.

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  4. What a wonderful post Mabel! I like the way you have explained each belief and then added your own perspective. I am familiar with a few tips that you have mentioned but never paid any attention to them though indoor plants have always provided solace to me and I tried to water them regularly 🙂
    Feng Shui seems to have made a major come back with the modern designers. Though colors add some charm and the direction of doors and windows contribute to positive energy that enters but a home is made peaceful by the persons who live in it…how they interact, the kind of respect they have for each other and the efforts they make to convert their house into a comfortable home.

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    • It is lovely to hear you find a connection with indoor plants, and you have the patience and heart to take care of them. No surprise if they stand tall and strong for you 🙂 I like how you say the different elements of Feng Shui and our tastes come together and respect each other…each element adding their own purpose, everything together in harmony. Thank you so much for your kind words and support, Balroop. Always lovely chatting 🙂

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  5. This is an excellent, well-balanced article on feng shui.

    Without my having tried, my house follows feng shui principles in most ways. My location, view, and door placement are all pretty good, and my bed is in the command position. I would like to have a water feature, but since I don’t, I often walk past the creeks in my neighborhood or walk to the end of the street to look at the bay. I have quite a few indoor plants, but I think it’s time to renew some that are old and not too healthy. I’ve chosen colors that make me feel happy and relaxed–pastel green, blue, white, and yellow with splashes of brighter color here and there. I open my blinds every morning so I can have light streaming in. I’m quite neat, but I can see that the clutter I do allow to accumulate can add up to negative qi.

    Thanks for all the good, reasonable advice.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks, Nicki. Maybe your house was designed according to Feng Shui principles.. Or maybe you just liked your house’s kind of floorplan all along. Earlier in the comments Autumn also mentioned her house just so happened to be aligned with Feng Shui principles too. That is interesting to hear indoor plants can become old and not too healthy. But I guess everything goes through wear and tear, and so do indoor plants after some time. Pastel colours give the illusion of calm, and it sounds like they work for you very well at home along with the sunshine streaming in every morning – the sunshine warming the house 🙂

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  6. This is an interesting article, Mabel. I’ve heard of Feng Shui, of course, but didn’t know much about it. I knew 8 was a lucky number for a house as I used to live in a number 8. Now I live in number 4, so I’m a bit worried about what that might mean. 🙂 Some aspects of my home match with the Feng Shui principles as you describe them and some don’t. I do agree with your concluding statements, though, about organising our house to suit us. I think that’s very sensible advice.

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  7. I don’t remember how or when I got interested in Feng Shui. I think I was in a bookstore and found Lillian Too’s book and fell in love with it. So for years I practiced it and since we moved often I got to move things around and practice it often.

    But like any obsession, it can wear thin, and eventually I stopped going crazy over what was where. I also didn’t experience any remarkable change in my life. But since I was a fan for years, I now cannot enter a business, hotel or house without thinking whether or not something is good or bad Feng Shui!

    So these days, I’m like, “it can’t hurt” and if I’m able to control where things are, then why not. But I wouldn’t say I’m a practitioner as the only thing I’ve consciously done to my current dwelling is hang some watercolors on the North wall of the apt.

    P.S. great photos as usual Mabel!

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    • It’s been a while since I heard of Lillian Too and her writings on Feng Shui. And she hails from Malaysia too. Need to set aside some time to check our her works at some point. It sounds like her works have rubbed off on you or at the very least made an impression on you, Lani. Sometimes change comes from the way you think, not just how you arrange your home and space. But it’s hard to argue against those who practice Feng Shui – they have avidly given thought to their space and what they might want to achieve, can achieve. The watercolour you have on your walls sound like they lighten up your home. Thanks for the nice words, Lani. So sorry for the late response to your comment but here I am!

      Liked by 1 person

      • No worries. 🙂

        I do think space and environment heavily effect our minds and health so it’s important to take it into consideration. Actually, I enjoy seeing how people create their homes, what’s important to them, etc. I think that is why I love having plants around – I like a living home!

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  8. Great post Mabel and very informative. I do believe in Feng Shui but not to the extreme though I’ve read quite a few books on the subject. I do try and keep the clutter to a minimum though it’s amazing how it builds up. A lot of it comes down to just good energy and keeping things clear, fresh and moving throughout the house.

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  9. Great post, Mabel. This may be a good reason to stop renting a one bedroom flat which seems to be the opposite of good Feng Shui. The one thing going for me, and the most important thing for my peace of mind is that I can wake up and see a body of water every morning. Sure, it’s an artificial lake full of coliform bacteria and cyanobacteria, but it’s a body of water. Being 650 metres above sea level and 300 km inland, this is the best I can do.

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  10. I saw this in my reader this morning and was quite looking forward to reading it. I practice Feng Shui somewhat I guess you could say. I love my indoor plants for better air quality. I definitely keep my belongings in a mindful way, an excess of things makes me anxious. I don’t pay as much attention to things like room color. Thanks for a very interesting read.

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    • Thanks, Amy. I like how you say you keep your belongings in a mindful way. Sounds like what you own has its purpose or means something to you. So interesting to hear you don’t pay much attention to room colour as colour is known to influence our moods…maybe that doesn’t affect you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

        • When you mentioned you process colour in an odd way, it reminds me of the fact that some of us are colour blind. To some, colour might be not stimulating whereas to others maybe like yourself, it can be a bit much. Good to know where you stand with colour 🙂

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  11. Interesting post, Mabel. I can’t say I practice Feng Shui consciously but there are certainly many elements of it that fit into my way of living. I need to be near water – we’ve got a pond with its own little waterfall. (We had koi when we first moved here but between otters, kingfishers and herons, they really didn’t last and we decided not to get any more). I need to have plants within view (and trees. I adore trees, though I wish our garden’s ones had been planted a little differently as in the summer I can’t see as much of the view beyond them.) Like you I do forget to water plants in the house but, thankfully, hubby doesn’t (usually!) We’ve a lovely garden and now live in a rural place where there are forests, hills and a river nearby. This wasn’t always the case: where we used to live really did make us ill, I think.

    I’m aware of the good feeling one gets when there’s space and no clutter but the reason I’m as messy as I am is because I have memory problems and need everything in view to be able to remember it exists! You can imagine how much clutter that results in… in fact, while I wouldn’t call myself a hoarder, that seems to be one of the definitions of such a type of person: the need to see what needs remembering. That said, I do badly need to get rid of a lot of it and tidy up. The amount of stuff I’ve got drives me completely nuts. Most of the time I’m on the pc and don’t see it (apart from the amount of it on my desk) because it’s mostly behind me. I wonder, sometimes, if that’s why I spend so much time on the computer… there’s a nice bright wide screen in front of me and I don’t have to remember what’s behind me!

    I’m curious about a couple of things. When you were a child did your parents consciously teach you the principles of Feng Shui or was it something you knew instinctively? And – in buildings with more than four floors… whatever happens to the fourth floor? Is it there but not used, is it bricked in, does the staircase circumvent it, or what?

    Oh, and like you, blue makes me feel peaceful. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • While you don’t practice Feng Shui, it sounds like you’ve given quite a bit of thought in what makes you comfortable at home. Sorry to hear the koi didn’t last and it doesn’t sound like the right location for them to swim peacefully. But I am sure you can enjoy the birds around. Plants in a garden can be lovely so long as you keep the weeds at bay, and good to hear your hubby pitches in with the watering. Perhaps there was something in the air or water where you previously lived and that made you feel ill :/

      ‘the need to see what needs remembering’ That is such a thoughtful way to put it, and I think that is why some of us keep quite a few things over time – because they are memories and hold sentimental value. While you might a have a lot of things even if you put them behind the PC, maybe they are of some value to you. When you have the time to reach behind the PC, maybe you will put out something and it will make you smile 🙂

      My parents never outright taught me Feng Shui, but it was a principle they reiterated from the way they chose and organised the places we lived in. Like my dad would insist this had to go here and that, saying if it’s here this means good…so I guess it was something I picked up instinctively. In some Asian cities, there is no fourth floor and the floors go 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and so on. I heard some buildings leave the fourth floor pretty dormant but not sure how true that is.

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      • Oh, I see – it’s the number that’s missing, not the floor. 🙂 There’s a similar thing about the number 13 in a lot of (probably English-speaking, but might be elsewhere) countries. So people would number things 12 and a half to avoid it!

        Oh yeah, definitely something in the air where we lived before – polluted air, traffic fumes, too much noise, and more.

        The remembering thing with me is not just nostalgia (I still have stuff from childhood and teens, and some of my parents’ things, though not a huge amount of it) but day to day stuff, like notes I’ve written myself. If I stack them or put them in a box or drawer, it’s like they don’t exist and so if I need to do things, I need to have them accessible (often overlapping in an unpleasantly higgledy-piggledy way. I need to change that!) 🙂

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        • Yes, it’s the number 4 that’s missing, not the floor. I’ve heard 13 can either be a lucky or not so lucky number among Westerners…depends what tickles your fancy I suppose.

          Those notes you’ve written sound comforting for you, giving you a sense of direction – essentially fragments of your mind and imagination. I also write notes to myself, like to-do lists or random things I’ve seen on the internet and want to revisit. I love the phrase higgledy-piggledy. Been a while since I’ve heard it 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    • Vaastu Shastra. Now that is something I need to check out some time. It is always an eye-opening experience when it comes to designing our personal spaces so they are in harmony with the energies around us and within us.

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  12. I have never known enough about feng shui to practice it, but I am happy to find that I seem to have followed every one of these pieces of advice except for the color ones! Maybe it’s a subconscious thing because I care very much about my living space. Very fun (and informative) read, Mabel!

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    • You are the second person to mention you don’t delve too deeply into colour schemes. Maybe you connect with objects more than colours. It seems Feng Shui is becoming more so a universal thing we practice whether we know it or not.

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  13. Interesting to note your views on Feng Shui. In India we have something similar known as Vaastu, which is all about facilitating free flow of energy through proper aligning of buildings and the designs going into their construction. The underlying concept is that we as a part of nature stay in tune with it as far as possible.

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    • Vaastu is something I’m not too familiar with and it’s something I’ll have to check out. Thank you for sharing it, Raj. Part of nature, staying in tune with nature. I like that. Hope you get to find an affinity in nature wherever you go 😊

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  14. Mabel, this is a fabulous and fascinating post about Feng Shui! I’ve always been interested in the concept and loved learning about the history of it and also how to adopt some of this in real life. Some elements are common sense I feel and I already use these in the home, others have given me food for thought. It’s interesting to read the research about the successful hotels v. The failing ones and their adoption of Feng Shui. A terrific article and I enjoyed reading your personal asides.

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    • Thanks, Annika. I also agree some Feng Shui elements are common sense, like your location and where you place your bed. The history behind the concept is interesting indeed – it’s a bit of a grey area yet so many of us can agree on the whole concept of it 🙂

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  15. very good post, Mabel. very interesting too. i do not practice feng shui but i keep our house free of clutter. we have a lot of windows so there’s lots of sun light flowing in. that makes our indoor plants happy and healthy. 🙂

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  16. Mabel to be honest I never understood, or took the time to understand what Feng Shui was. I appreciate how you have written the article in bit size chunks that are easy to read and absorb. I though about our own home as I read your words. In most cases we seem to have by accident or some intuition, have our home set up according to the guidelines of Feng Shui. When we downsized and began travelling more we did get rid of indoor plants however. I don’t have much of a green thumb. I appreciate your reassurance or acceptance that not all of the items may suit an individual and keeping one’s own style and comfort is important.

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    • Maybe the principles are ingrained in most of us or are really just universal principles. It sounds like you are a very organised person at home (no surprise since you are such an organised traveler). Sometimes we can certainly do without indoor plants as it may be more convenient that way. We’re all comfortable in our own ways and how we live 🙂

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  17. Yes, I do believe in this philosophy (or science?). Sometimes there’s something bothering us about our surroundings, but we can’t put our finger on what it is. studying some feng shui can really help pin point the issues. Clutter is a biggie. The first time I practiced Feng Shui was in the 90’s. I found that when I removed clutter, I felt so much better. Is this common sense? I guess it is to a point but the elements and colors can really help us understand the atmosphere we’re creating. So, I vote a big YES to feng shui. Thanks for this educational post, Mabel!

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    • Didn’t know you practiced Feng Shui, Lisa. It can bring about a sense of rejuvenation when we organise our home to our liking, and if we get rid of clutter and things that don’t serve purpose to us anymore. Maybe it is common sense, or maybe some of us just prefer less clutter and more space. Thanks for stopping by, Lisa 🙂

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  18. Feng Shui was all the rage in the US a few years back but seems to have lost its luster of late Mabel. I think much of it is common sense and do believe in some of its basic principles. Light, openness, and bringing the outside in (assuming you are fortunate enough to have a home in a lovely environment) all makes total sense to me!

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    • A lot about Feng Shui is commonsense, and parallels embodiments of nature: light, space, plants, water and more. The more in tune we are with ourselves, the more we can make our home our home.

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  19. Like your Feng Shui, many Indians believe and follow Vastu Shastra while purchasing/renting a house. If someone is having a run of ill luck they often blame it on Vastu. According to Vastu, a house is considered to be a living soul! But I believe each has their own philosophies (not that I know anything about it) and are not interchangeable. However for that reason, Feng shui is quite popular in India especially those bamboo plants and wind chimes ( I do love their sound). To practice any of these needs a lot of work and that itself is a big deterrent for my lazy nature 😀
    Btw I loved your photos, super cool captures! So are my burger and fries ready?

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    • And here you come indeed, a barrel of laughs 🤡😀 Vastu sounds interesting and it’s something I’ll have to look up some time. A house a living soul – that sound similar to the Feng Shui analogy where the centre of the home is considered the heart of your life. Wind chimes! Haven’t heard them in a long while, and haven’t seen many of them in Australia (seems to be more common in Asia). I’m not sure if the wind chimes are too noisy for you on a windy night when you are trying to sleep…

      I am so ready for burger and fries. Already got the burger and fries right here 🍔🍟🍔🍟😀

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  20. Wonderful post, Mabel, the art of Fengshui has always interested me since I first learned about it. I think the concept is almost universal, as people in the States and Europe love the idea of balance and a more healthy lifestyle ~ just what you show throughout your post here, these are things Fengshui can bring. It seems the theory of Fengshui blends in well with some of the philosophies of the East as well, which is another reason I enjoy it. Looking around at my place right now…I think I need to reassess my Fengshui, as it looks a little chaotic right now 🙂

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  21. I picked up a book about Feng Shui on a bookstall quite some time ago, Mabel. It was quite detailed and I think I lost the plot so it’s interesting to read your interpretation. One thing that stuck with me is that cut flowers are bad Feng Shui so for some time I stopped buying fresh flowers. But I do love them so the ‘bad’ habit crept back. 🙂 🙂 Doing a grand job of decluttering as the Algarve move is imminent. One of the things to go is the Feng Shui book. 🙂

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  22. Loved this post Mabel, thanks for the rules. I actually am familiar with most of them, I read a book on Feng Shui years back. Is it true the #4 isn’t appreciated in an address because it signifies death? Also, being someone who tries to do my best with feng shui and have bought an renovated a few homes, I remember that it’s not a good omen to buy a house with a stairway in front of the front door? 🙂 ❤

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  23. Hallo liebe Mabel kann jetzt wieder schreiben ist ja schon lange her wo ich mich gemeldet habe es sind so schön Fotos in deinem Blog toll gemacht hab einen sonnigen schöne Dienstag Klaus in Freundschaft

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  24. An interesting post on believing in an ancient practice in modern times. I don’t know if I believe in something without seeing a reason behind it. When we shifted into a new apartment (2 months ago) I knew I wanted the sunlight inside the rooms. With an east-west facing apartment, it ensures theres natural light at any point of the day. 🙂 What I didn’t factor in was the grey spells we have here in autumn and winter. I guess you win some and lose some. lol

    Liked by 1 person

    • ‘I don’t know if I believe in something without seeing a reason behind it.’ This is such a profound statement, Cheryl. If there’s a logic behind something, then more likely there are less surprises. Sorry to hear about the grey spells in the cooler months…maybe you could have warmer toned lighting in your apartment to make it seem more warm and homely 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Wow Mabel, you really have given us ton’s of information to consider when decorating our homes.. My daughter at one time was well into Feng-shui.. and I truly believe in the power of creating an ambient space through the use of decor and colour..
    I am happy to see that by reading through some of your tips here, I have naturally done some of it… The colour of my living-room the chimney breast has an earth colour of dark mushroom.. while the other colours are oat-meal..
    My bedroom I am also pleased to say concur with your findings.. And thankfully my front and back door are not in a straight line..

    I also have a little frog who sits with a coin in his mouth facing away from the front door.. Which I am assured by my daughter who bought me him, infers that we will never run short of wealth … Not that we are by any means rich.. But wealth to me comes not in the form of monetary gain, but in the wealth of gifts we have in each other as a family..

    Our garden also has a small pond, ( plants you know of ) 🙂 and a small little fountain pump that keep the fish supplied with some oxygen..

    So loved all of the beautiful images too Mabel that you have supplied within your beautiful post..
    May the energy of Love and Abundance in ALL things surround you at all times Mabel..

    Love and Peace your way ❤ 💙🙏💙

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  26. Good points and information. I don’t actively practice this but when I am in a room that feels or looks wrong, it’s often in contravention of the rules of Feng Shui. It’s big business now as well. Hotels and businesses employ specialists in Feng Shui these days. I believe there is logic in many of the rules.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Draco. You are right. Feng Shui is big business and some making a living off being Feng Shui consultants. In a way it’s fortune telling of your surroundings. Logic in the rules…and most certainly logic amongst what we feel around us.

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  27. My parents aren’t exactly the type who believes in feng shui, but they have incorporated elements of it into the household, i.e. the house’s main door must not face a T-junction and insisting for the absence of number 4 from the house number to the car number plates.

    As for plants, I didn’t know that it carries a feng shui element to it. My current residence doesn’t have any plants at all – and I’m pretty comfortable with it. Based on what I’ve learnt from my neighbours back home, we shouldn’t have cactus because it has a negative effect on the occupants of the house too…

    Liked by 1 person

    • It sounds like your parents feel the elements of Feng Shui to a degree, and probably quite a few of us do.

      Cactus is a prickly plant, and some say it gives off jolts of energy that may hit us too hard and make us restless. I think whether we like plants or not has got to do with personal taste.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well, I guess it’s an inert thing growing up with a Chinese culture. Even though I’m now abroad, I still observe some of the don’ts during the Hungry Ghost Festival – like don’t go out too late, don’t cut your nails at night, don’t leave your laundry overnight. I guess once you’re exposed to it, you tend to retain some of the exposure wherever you are.

        I never fancied cactus – ever since I was poked by that prickly plant in a nursery.

        ‘I think whether we like plants or not has got to do with personal taste.’ – Yup, I definitely agree. My father and I aren’t avid plant lovers whereas my mother is. She loves her plants and flowers.

        Like

        • It sounds like you’ll always know where you come from, or more specifically what you’ve been taught no matter where you go. Some might call what you believe in superstition, bu really it is just cultural. It’s like how I will always want to take off my shoes before entering a house, be it mine or one that I’m visiting.

          I get hayfever around blooming plants and flowers. Even if I didn’t, I’d still can do without them XD

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          • Oh my gosh, you remind me of what happened to me last week. Just because I had an evening run at the nearby park (which I have not done in months because I was lazy and the weather was bone-chilly), the flowers gave me a sneezing attack a couple of days later, lol. No wonder a stranger gave me a weird glance – as if to say you’re under the weather and still out and about? Why didn’t you take allergy medicine? Oddly enough, the flowers/plants in Malaysia never seem to affect me. It’s always them dust pollens that get to me. Each. Single. Time.

            ‘It’s like how I will always want to take off my shoes before entering a house, be it mine or one that I’m visiting.’ – Same!!! When I’m in Malaysia, I do it out of habit. But whenever I’m visiting Asian friends, I have to ask them whether they need me to remove my shoes. I usually leave it up to my friends whenever they visit me – whether they want to remove or keep their shoes on… unless I’ve just cleaned the place.

            Like

            • Now that you mention it, I also don’t sneeze around flowers in Malaysia. Maybe it’s because of the way higher levels of humidity over there – dampness in the air to wash and carry the pollen away so to speak. Antihistamine/allergy medicine just does not agree with me, and I react badly to them sadly.

              You are very nice to let your friends who visit keep their shoes on. I am like no, shoes off please…you don’t no where those shoes have gone walking 😛

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              • ‘Antihistamine/allergy medicine just does not agree with me, and I react badly to them sadly.’ – I don’t take allergy medicine, no matter how bad the sneezing gets. I usually take a lot of Vitamin C (drank so much lime until my stomach ached from the acidity) and let it ride out on its own. I’ve even attended class while I had the allergy attack – not recommended for anyone else.

                ‘You are very nice to let your friends who visit keep their shoes on.’ – Only if I know that I am going to clean the house once they have left. I myself have worn shoes inside once or twice out of laziness and only for the tiled floor. My dear friend removed his shoes the first time he came around only because our mutual friend’s a Malaysian. He did it automatically when he came alone the second time around – something to do with adhering with CNY traditions. 😅

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                • It sounds bad that you had to attend the class with the allergy attack. Some classes just cannot be missed and you have to push through XD

                  If I forget something, just about to go out and my shoes are already on, I’d leave them on and walk across the house…and a part of me dies a bit lol. Your friend there is very thoughtful to take his shoes off when coming over to visit lol. No need to be told 🙂

                  p/s – I left two comments on your blog. Can you remove the first one because I commented as the wrong person lol 😅

                  Like

                  • And I’m not the type who likes to attend tutorials when I’m having an allergy attack – because it will pose a disturbance to my peers, but yeah, the things you do when the participation is counted, aha.

                    Well, that friend of mine…. he knows that I have retained a large element of my Malaysian way of life even though I’m in Australia. Or he’s trying to get used to the idea so that he doesn’t make any mistakes if he wants to visit an Asian country in the future?

                    No wonder – the content seemed similar yet it was written by two different folks, lol. 😅 I’ve removed the first comment… the one under the wrong name.

                    Like

                    • Either way I think your friend is considerate, taking his shoes off before coming into your house. He shows an awareness about another culture, whereas there are some people who will just walk in with shoes on thinking like your house is theirs 😅

                      Thanks for cleaning up the comment 🙂

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • ‘Either way I think your friend is considerate, taking his shoes off before coming into your house.’ – Well, that’s true. At least he’s considerate enough to ask… I can’t help but wonder whether he’s checked with his friends about the Asian culture of removing shoes upon entering a person’s house, though. Now I have to see whether he still remembers to take off his shoes if and whenever he visits someone in Malaysia. 😆

                      All good, Mabel.

                      Like

                    • Maybe your friend really is a nice guy and considerate, and probably will remember to take off his shoes if he visits you again. Some people are just thoughtful and nice like that, respecting how you set up your home, furniture, rules and all 🙂

                      Liked by 1 person

  28. Wow, Mabel. Heard about it for the first time. I design houses and I must say indirectly we follow the same rules. It is actually scientific. Thanks for explaining this way old technique. It just shows us that how this world knew so much in the past that we are just redefining and reinventing now.

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  29. A very interesting post Mabel and I do believe a home where the energy flows is a happy home. Here on the coast people have their own beliefs, especially among the families of fishermen. It was considered bad luck if your house and especially the front door faced the sea as the men who went out to sea to fish may not return. For this reason all the fishermen’s cottages have their back to the sea 🙂💜

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Xenia. That is an interesting belief along the coast where you live. If your front doors faced the sea, I guess sea breezes might be coming directly to you all the time, and you might feel cooler than usual – and some might not prefer this along with what you mentioned about how one might not return from a trip out to sea. Very, very interesting and thanks for sharing :)💖

      Liked by 1 person

  30. A very interesting read, Mabel. I haven’t really ever given a lot of thought to Feng Shui, but I do have a red south-facing front door, which I have since discovered is the optimum colour. I do enjoy being able to see water from my house. Our previous house in South Africa had a sea view and our present one in Florida has a lovely view straight down a lake, plus we have a small fish pond with a waterfall. I also realised from reading your post that I have many other features which comply with Feng Shui recommendations. You’ve also alerted as to why I feel so disquieted when visiting the home of a certain family member who despite having a gorgeous home, is very messy, untidy and careless with belongings. I really don’t enjoy any sort of chaos in my surroundings and am always hugely relieved when the visit comes to an end. Your post also made me think of people who through no fault of their own are living in total chaos. I’m especially mindful of people who live in war zones, who really have no chance of a peaceful setting for themselves and their families. My heart aches for them as they strive to find a peaceful space amid the terrible turmoil which surrounds them. Thanks so much, Mabel for another splendid read. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Such a spirited reflection, Sylvia. Thank you so much for sharing. It sounds like your homes previously and the one right now does have good Feng Shui. You must have seen many lovely sunrises and sunsets along the water, and hope the sea breezes aren’t too chilly in the cooler months for you. It is lovely of you to visit your family member at home when you get the chance, and very polite of you to keep your thoughts about their home to yourself. Maybe they find comfort in chaos…but like you, I prfer to be careful and organised with my belongings. You are so right some of us don’t have a permanent place of settling down, like those who live in war zones and also those who can’t afford rent or a roof over their heads. A roof over our heads is always something to cherish. Once again, thank you for reading 🙂

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  31. Oh wow I didn’t know at lot of these facts about feng sui in the home! For example, I learned that the mirror across from the bed is not advisable. In homes, I like what we call here “open concept” meaning few or no walls between the living room, eating area, and kitchen. I think it provides great flow and good vibes. I am sharing your post on Twitter and Pinterest 🙂

    Like

    • I often wonder why some people like to have a mirror across the bed…looking at myself in bed is not something I like lol. There are more and more open-concept homes these days. I grew up with the kitchen sectioned off to keep the cooking smells and spills away from the rest of the house…these days many apartments don’t cater for a door to the ktichen lol. Thank you so much for sharing, Christy. Very kind of you. Hugs across the miles 🙂

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  32. Such a detailed and well-researched post, Mabel. Even though Feng-Shui is a Chinese concept, many Indians also follow it, thanks to globalization. We have ancient Feng-Shui equivalent – Vastu, which also has a large following. Many people take Vastu in totality whereas it was quite scientific as many principles are based on elements like lights, air etc. I think we should all accept these tenets with a pinch of salt and not as an absolute principle. I missed reading this write-up and found it only when I visited your blog. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Mabel, what an excellent post full of information on Feng Shui. At one time I had my entire home blueprinted by someone educated in Feng Shui and I pretty much followed what was suggested. Some not all. For example …. we have an intersection of a street (T) that lines up to our western property line, so to block this flow of traffic from entering our home we planted evergreens to absorb this energy. We also planted Maple Trees in a particular (V-shaped) pattern between our home and the street so that the trees themselves would absorb (again) the energy from the street. Colors within our home basically are according to Feng Shui with the warmer colors in North facing rooms. Water and plants I cannot do because of my cats but for that I have more then made up for that outside with my plentiful gardens.

    My intention within my home and on our property is to create peace and for sure, when you walk on our property, if you are sensitive, you can sense it. We have a bird sanctuary here with hundreds of birds nesting every year. Hummingbirds are here, Boston Orioles, deer, rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks, all happily coexisting. As for clutter …. my house could be considered bare by some. I do not like clutter yet my closets and drawers are so due to a life so busy I do not have the time nor the energy to clean them out. That day will come. Our basement and garage have been cleaned out and organized, two huge places where clutter is evident in a lot of homes here. Our barn may be crammed but it is organized. When the flow of energy is created to flow in gentle patterns, it makes so much difference.

    Again, a most excellent and thorough post. Your images are stunning, my favorite being the one of the white gull in flight. Excellent shot!!! Keep on writing!! You are so talented!! 💝

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    • Your experience with Feng Shui has been interesting to read, Amy. We all have different tastes and believes, and so it’s natural that you don’t follow all the principles. You do sound very knowledgeable about Feng Shui for you know how to reflect bad energy away, planting trees strategically to absorb energy – and all those trees must have made for a very lovely front yard. Hope the warm colours in your North facing rooms gave you a cozy, warm feel.

      Love how you create your property and home on the basis of peace, and try to reflect that all round. No surprise the animals from the hummingbirds to the rabbits and squirrels like to pop by for visits again and again. A bit of clutter doesn’t hurt…for when you need something, that stuffed basement and garage might come in handy.

      You are very kind, Amy. Thank you for your kind words on my photography. Lucky bird shots, I call those. Lots of love to you ❤

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  34. Your images are remarkable as always Mabel. I love your style – simple, crisp perfection. Apparently, we do practice a good deal of Feng Shui here on Amandla, but you’ve given me some thoughts for improvement.
    Location and view – roger that
    Door placement – windows and companionway always open here.
    Bed Placement – surrounded by three walls which makes for a nice little nest. I do have a hatch above my head, often open, but that just allows my love to flow to the universe for every good day I am given on the sea
    Water Fountain – check. I live on one
    Plants – when we are at anchor, Mother Nature’s bounty surrounds us
    Color – we’ve got a lot of blue and brown with hints of Red going on here on Amandla. Sounds like we need to get us some green.
    Clutter – I was always a minimalist but The Captain is a bit of a pack rat with pieces and parts that ‘we may need someday’ But I let him keep his excess (well stored below) because he really does find a use for every part and piece eventually.
    Space – just enough
    Light – plenty

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    • You are very kind, Lisa. Thank you for your nice words. That is amazing you practice Feng Shui on board Amandla. No space too small to practice it, and it does sound like you tick many boxes. Having a hatch above your bed sounds good for star-gazing at night, and letting in a breeze to lull you to sleep when it’s warm. Amazing to hear that nature and the relaxing colour of blue surrounds you day in and day out. As for the clutter, well, sounds like The Captain is playing it safe by keeping odds and ends. When you need something, you need something. If it ever gets to messy, Mr Wobbles is happy to come over and throw things overboard 🙊🙉⛵🌊💙😃

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  35. I remember working out Feng Shui principles for the last 2 houses I had (in the US); I think it makes sense to be orderly even though with my last house it took me a long time to achieve. When we moved in we put mirrors in the advised places, a jade plant, and outside, a bird-bath and planting’s to complete the corner of the house.
    I’m with you on the dark earthy colors though. Thanks for sharing your perspective on Feng Shui. And btw I always think of it when I see buildings with knife-like shapes pointing at the ones next door — threatening!

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    • Your last house must have been actually a challenging house to make orderly as you’ve always seem to organise things without much hassle. Hope it ended up being a lovely place to live in.

      Buildings with knife-like shapes – haven’t seen these kinds of buildings around here, but they don’t sound very friendly to the eye.

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  36. Interesting article, Mabel. This reminds me a bit of a book I read once about surrounding oneself with things one loves to make one’s space vibrate a feeling of home. By the way, I have quite a few no-no’s in my bedroom, but my address number is in harmony with four. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Olga. That sounds like an interesting book you read. Different things make us tick differently. So if you house is in harmony with the number 4 and you are surrounded by what you can connect with, good on you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • In the NH you get passive solar if the building faces south. In the Southern Hemisphere you would want to have the front of the house to face north.

        Actually, you might have to re-think all of the feng shui for the southern hemisphere, since the coriolis effect makes southern hemisphere cyclones (and toilets) spin clockwise, the seasons are reversed, and all those other upside down southern hemisphere relationships. Ha.

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        • That is interesting, facing buildings towards the sun so as to get solar power. Now that you mention all of that, maybe here in the southern hemisphere need to rethink Feng Shui principles…or maybe so do you too in different seasons or in the face of climate change 😀

          Liked by 1 person

  37. As usual Mabel such a detailed and lovely post, and yes how this traditional concept is getting aligned with the modern architectural design and the whole idea of bringing peace and harmony in our life.The space we live and the place we work, and balancing these very fundamental aspects of life…is perhaps the true art of living our life. Feng Shui is so much about the concept of Vastu Shastra that we have been India, it also revolves around the importance of energy and comprises of five elements, only difference instead of wood and metal, it includes air and space.

    Across the world we have these fundamental principles in place and such traditional practices encompassing nature is very much there in our culture and customs, it just that in some place it continues to stay and grow with the changing thoughts of people, and many others it has got somewhat diluted and largely lost with the invasion of modern thoughts and new practices.

    Even if we take aside the science these elements of nature are so much what defines our surrounding and our engagement with nature. After all everything is energy or matter in another form, and matter is also a form of energy, and in essence life is all about connecting and working with these multiple energy sources. Though many people are biased towards modern thinking and not fully aware of these traditional concepts undermine the fundamental philosophy behind such profound thoughts. Indeed there is a philosophy in such practices where we see the synergy that energy brings in our life when we place the positive energy in perspective and wade away the negative energies that attempts to invade into our private space and disturb our harmony and balance.

    As nicely highlighted the role of color and shape that indeed shapes the way we craft the space in each of our rooms and the outlook of our house, connection between different rooms, and the broader surrounding around the house…the direction of the door to the window for the energy to enter and not allow the energy to escape. Energy needs to be conserved and preserved. Everything that we think and do, needs energy and we just get one form of energy from food and there are these intangible energy around us makes us think positive and do things better. The placement of plants to to the management of natural illumination make such a huge difference to the house we live in and the way we live our life.

    Hope everything is fine at your end. Now a days it has become bit delayed from my side, but I keep good time to come here and absorb every bit of your wonderful thoughts.
    Have a lovely week ahead.
    Take Care!!!
    😀

    Liked by 2 people

    • What a thoughtful comemnt about organising our space with our culture and beliefs in mind, Nihar. Vastu sounds very familiar to Feng Shui, with the energy intertwining with five environmental concept surrounding us. While our cultures may be different, how we orchestrate our lives may be similar – and that includes how we design our homes…though we have our individual tastes, the underlying principles are so similar.

      The that there is invasion with modern thoughts and new practices these days. Take for example the fact that many new apartments comes with floor to ceiling windows (and mirrors). Such design is designed to let light in and give one a good view. But on the other hand, it leaves one exposed if you don’t have the blinds down (which you need to be up to get natural lighting. Also if this kind of glass isn’t fitted properly, it can lead to poor air circulation and overall, bad Feng Shui. So I guess we can’t rule out science completely from the equation when it comes to making our home comfortable.

      You are so right that traditional thoughts have much basis and foundation in the way the world is today. Energy is a matter in another form. From a science perspective, energy is a bunch of atoms, and energy is transferable: your energy is my energy and that is how we are all human and the same. Where there is positive energy there will be negative – either they go in and out, or round and round, ebbing and flowing. All a part of life and its challenges and triumphs.

      ‘Energy needs to be conserved and preserved.’ Once again I agree with you and might I add energy also needs to be expended. Sometimes we just have to let go some forms of energy, especially the kind that frustrates and annoys us. As you said, maybe we need plants to give variety to our space or maybe a new colour scheme to match our moods.

      Another insightful chat, Nihar. Hope you are well. I must make time to come over to yours at some point. Busy life, but there will always be time 🙂

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      • Belief, Culture and Practices has its own flavor as it goes from one society to another or as it moves one era to another. As people evolves and society keep changing its course and content. But the fundamental of nature remains the same, though externally we keep seeing the cosmetic changes. House is just an extension of nature and we construct a place to make our living safe and bring more comfort to our life. The question then comes up is the house that we have constructed has taken the principles and foundation that governs nature or have we broken those rules. And if we do, we create disharmony in the ecosystem of living of life.

        Energy is all that matters and it keeps coming in different forms. It is so essential to know the negative energy and provide an outlet to let go those energies harmful to our existence. Nature is the basic source of all energies and the elements of nature are not considered well in our design of houses we are crossing the sword with nature and it then creates conflicts between man and nature…there are different ways to look at the same thing, and the way scientists and the spiritual guru look at energy is quite different, and their interpretations has a different perspective.

        Yes, these modern architects sometime get carried away with the look and fashion, and many times miss out on the basics much like the one you mentioned regarding the big mirrors in the windows…but many places the customers are demanding before buying a property and architects are taking into consideration all these aspects into the frame of good design.

        Always a pleasure Mabel having such thoughtful discussion and so much to learn with every new topic.
        😀

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        • Another elegant comment from you, Nihar. People change, society at large also changes. But yes, fundamental concepts somehow remains the same. You are so right when you say house is an extensino of nature – it’s where we live, where we naturally grow physically, mentally and emotionally, and we naturally (for most part) go to sleep and wake up at home each day. So in a way, a house does underpin principles that governs nature: darkness and light, rise and shine, living in cycles and seasons. As you know, balance and harmony can be hard to achieve. But it is up to us to control what is within our homes.

          Again so right that nature is the basic source of all energies. Opposing energies are those that often destruct, maybe something we feel physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually. Energies can certainly be looked at from different perspectives – and perhaps energy can be something that is more magical to some, and more tangible to others.

          Yes, many customers have their preferences when it comes to choosing a place to stay. In this commodified world, if the property sector wants to be in business, it has to listen to customers and their wants and needs. Here’s hoping there will be more variety of house and apartments in the market in the future.

          Always a pleasure chatting as usual, Nihar 😀

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          • So true Mabel, life is so much about balancing of things emotional, mentally and spiritually to get the perfect harmony and happiness. All these comes profusely and purposefully from the nature and there is a connect we all have to establish with the soul of nature and there is a voice that keeps calling and we are so much drowned in the cacophony of our busyness and city life we pretend to be deaf top to sounds of nature, and there is those painful consequences what wake us up.

            With every change of era, we see something new dawning in our society and we adapt few and we confront few, and this sage of embracing and facing keep us churned and we evolve as society and the civilization moves from one set of people to another who have a altogether different outlook towards life, as we move one ear to another.

            Same here Mabel and have a lovely week ahead.
            😀

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            • Nature does keep calling to us and nature calms us in more ways than one, and so all the more reason to design our house in accordance to the principles of natures, seasons and cycles. The cacophony of business in city life can be motivating and stimulating, but it can get too much and there will then be a need for retreat. And when we do want a retreat and a time to relax, home is always a good starting point if not for most of us, our comfortable place. We wake up and go to bed at home mwost days when we’re at most need of rest, so another reason to make our home comfortable.

              SO true. With change comes something new – maybe for good or for the better. ‘sage of embracing’ sounds so philosophical, Nihar 😀 No matter good or bad, all of us need to embrace change. Different people, different outlook, different ways of living. Take care 😀😀

              Liked by 1 person

              • Indeed Mabel, designing our houses keeping in mind the principles of nature is what makes the house a home but with modern architecture driving the change, it is the style that dominates, fundamental aspects are given a dressing down and as a result we have good looking house but the living inside has deep loopholes that keep disturbing the peace and harmony of living our life.

                Wherever we go and whatever we do, finally we all want to be back home and nothing can beat the comfort and joy of being where we belong…
                Thanks Mabel and you too take care!!!
                😀

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                • Wise words. A good looking house may be a good looking house, but it is only so much. The set-up and choices leading up to the setup and interior alignment speaks about us, and if it really is truly is what we want and believe in, then it will be a house where will be comfortable. Some of us may like modern architecture, fair enough. But at the end of the day, all of us are connected to nature in some way and it wouldn’t do harm to remind ourselves of our natural surroundings now and then.

                  Yes, wherever we go and whatever we do, we all do want to go home and to be where we belong. Nothing like a good cozy home where everything feels right. Have a good weekend, Nihar 😀

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Yes Mable it is Nature and then the Home, where the mind and heart finds solace, peace and happiness that is what ultimately matters in our life.
                    You too have a great weekend.
                    Take Care!!!
                    😀

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                    • Nature and then the Home, and then Home and Nature. It all comes around full circle. Feeling peace and happiness at home, we can be the best version of ourselves.

                      Take care 😀

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  38. Superb clarification of the often complicated sphere of Feng Shui Mabel. thank you. This is particularly valuable as the season change and Fall is a great excuse for tidying up ready for the holidays. I’m fascinated to learn that ‘Feng Shui has been around since the 9 BC or maybe even earlier’. Great to know these ideas are not fads as I know people have invested a lot.

    I love your closing point that ultimately it’s about being comfortable in our homes and also the permission slip you give to practice Feng Shui now and then. In Western homes it’s a challenge to get all the boxes ticked! I do have a gold ingot for wealth flow. Moving forward I’m also keen to add some blue to the house. Grateful for some vibrant and profound ideas!

    Happy Autumn to you my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Lita. Feng Shui has indeed been around for a while, and it is still going strong. Some of it we might believe, some of it not, each to their own. Maybe you will get around to sprucing up your home for Autumn and the cooler months ahead.

      Hope that gold inglot brings you some luck. With these things you just never know. Blue sounds like a good colour scheme for your place. Happy decorating 🙂

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  39. Interesting. My parents thought less of feng shui. I don’t they knew much of it. They assessed their homes for: closeness to local transit, a street that was safe traffic wise/quieter, walking distance to a grocery store, some services and a park.Decent areas to walk to home and feel reasonably safe.
    And they preferred brick homes.

    Now, I do sorta believe in “karma” feel of a place for a business to do well. The right corner/neighbourhood, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Loving your tips Mabel. Sensational post. Clearing clutter is a biggie for me. My old apartment looked Spartan to folks but it helped me proceed in orderly fashion, keeping my energy stable. No chaos or panic or anxiety with junk sitting around.

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    • Thanks, Ryan. If your old apartment looked Spartan to the eye, it must have been jam-packed. Maybe you discovered some treasures in the clean-up. Lovely to hear your old apartment got organised in the end.

      Like

  41. I know very little about feng shui so this was a wonderful post to read through to get more knowledge about it. 🙂 My parents don’t practice feng shui at all, I think, or at least not intentionally. My mom has lots of small plants indoors and tends to a garden in the backyard with flowers, herbs, and vegetables but I feel it’s more because she enjoys gardening and growing things.

    My dad brought a water fountain home once and had the crazy idea to buy a bunch of goldfish and let them swim in it. This turned out to be a terrible idea because neither the depth of the fountain or the water quality was suitable for animals to be living in it. Almost all of the fish died and the few that somehow survived I ended up moving them indoors into a filtered aquarium tank.

    Neighborhood-wise, some big factors that led to my parents choosing the house they bought were closeness to the local subway (for them to get to work) and closeness of schools (for me and my brother). Of course safety was a concern too. My bed is up against a wall so I may be in some trouble there lol… Floor to ceiling walls doesn’t sound nice to me either. Too much exposure. I have never been a fan of blinds either. I don’t like the style of how they open and close. Curtains are okay as long as I can have control over how light I am letting in. I never open it all the way unless I intend to not be in the room because I’d rather not let people outside see me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Nat! It does sound like you are quite aware of the principles of Feng Shui, though it might not be outright mentioned in your family. Apart from enjoying gardening, maybe your mum sees it as a productive way to pass the time.

      Wow, your dad sounded very adventurous with the fountain and seems he was eager to put some fish there before thinking through it. Too excited lol XD Hope the fishes you rescued went to live in the filtered aquarium tank.

      Proximity to amenities is so important when it comes to choosing a house to stay, and sounds like your parent’s house is convenient to get to essential places to and fro. There are many kinds of blinds. Not sure which one you don’t like but I don’t mind the ones with the many rectangular flaps or magnetic blinds. My blinds are the ones where you roll up and down and I don’t mind those. Not a huge fan of curtains because I feel they collect dust more easily compared to blinds.

      Like

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