7 Differences Between Asian and Western Beauty Standards

Every culture has their own perceptions of beauty. While there are similarities, Asian and Western cultures often have very different beauty standards.

Certain looks are often favoured in Asian cultures. In Western cultures and for many Caucasians, the ‘ideal look’ can be very different.

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Having lived in both Asia and Australia, I’ve noticed different people and cultures measure beauty differently. What is attractive and beautiful to someone may not be to someone of another background.

Beauty and what it means to be beautiful is subjective. It’s often defined by history and cultural and personal values. There’s beauty on the outside, and beauty within.

Here are some common perceptions, trends and differences between Asian and Western beauty standards, with a focus on East and South-East Asian and Australian beauty standards among women.

Asian vs western beauty standards

1. Eyes

Round, big doe eyes with double eyelids tend to be favoured in Asian cultures. Monolids are often seen as unattractive.

Blepharoplasty or double eyelid surgery is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures among Chinese, Japanese and Korean women. Some want to look ‘more white’ with bigger eyes while others argue double eyelids simply gives the illusion of more open eyes regardless of ethnicity. Bigger, doe eyes are commonly seen as more feminine and doll-like which is often desired in the feminine Asian epitome.

For many Caucasians, what’s the most common, most fascinating and more attractive eye colour is a popular topic. Research has shown blue eyes seem to be idolised and interestingly enough, the blonde-hair blue-eyed Aussie stereotype is one of the more memorable looks around the world.

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2. Nose

Asians generally have flatter, wider noses compared to Westerners. There’s a preference for smaller, slender and straight noses among many Asian women, and this was explored in a study on ideal facial beauty in China. This look for a nose arguably mimics the shape of Western noses to some degree, but on a smaller scale. Interestingly enough, some Westerners see big noses as beautiful.

3. Face

When it comes to facial structure, smaller, V-shaped faces is highly desired among Asian women. This usually entails a rounder forehead with round eyes, and a slim chin and jawline, which are markers of Korean beauty standards. Caucasian women on the other hand seem to prefer higher, protruding cheekbones.

When it comes to makeup, Asians lean towards natural makeup looks. Many like the glowy, glass-like skin look that projects a youthful, innocent aura. Westerners normally show fiercer makeup looks such as favouring sharp, bold contoured cheekbones – which coincidentally matches the stereotypical outgoing, friendly white Australian persona and gives the illusion of a tan.

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4. Skin colour

Many in South-East Asia prefer having fair skin. Some are obsessed with having their skin look as pale as possible, wearing long sleeve clothing and using umbrellas to shield themselves from the sun to avoid getting tanned. Skin whitening products are all the rage in many parts of Asia too.

Fair skin is a marker of privilege and class in Asian cultures. It has been desired throughout history in Chinese culture, symbolising a luxurious life as opposed to a life of laborious work in paddy fields and getting very tanned skin as a result.

In other words, looking ‘dark’ is seen as ‘ugly and poor’ to some Chinese. Moreover, getting tanned also generally leads to more wrinkles and skin damage, and looking youthful is prided upon among many Asians.

On the other hand, many Australians desire to look a few shades darker. Many Anglo-Saxon Australians are fond of tanning during summer and see a tan as attractive.

5. Body type

There’s the common perception that slender and slim bodies are the epitome of beauty across Asian, Western and many other cultures. A bigger chest is also usually regarded as attractive.

Noticeably many people tend to have larger physiques in Western places, such as larger physical stature and more voluptuous bodies. There is generally more proudness and acceptance of these kinds of bodies here compared to places in Asia.

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6. Feet

Historically small feet is desired in Chinese culture. Along with having a small face and petite body, small feet is seen as beautiful. During the Tang Dynasty in China, foot-binding was common among young women to restrict their normal foot growth.

Not much has been said about the relationship between feet and beauty in Western cultures. However, if you have big feet it’s usually hard to find shoes in the right size anywhere.

7. Clothes

The trend to look kawaii in Asia is quite popular. Made popular in Japan, dressing up and looking innocent, naïve or childlike is part of the kawaii look (also known as cute Asian fashion), along with wearing colours. Often looking young and docile is seen as attractive; in Asian cultures youthfulness is prided upon and dressing up is also a kind of escapism from working long hours.

Here in Melbourne wearing black is quite the trend. People here wear black a lot as it blends in with different outfits throughout different seasons – and arguably a colour that is flattering on many.

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Everyone defines beauty differently. Sometimes you won’t understand someone’s perception of beauty. Perhaps how someone dresses or how they see another culture’s habits or traits can even amuse you.

For instance, once I was on the tram and this Caucasian lady got up and offered her seat to two short, petite elderly Asian women. The two elderly Asian ladies looked greatful and sat down. The moment they sat down, one of them said in Mandarin, ‘This seat is so hot! Just like other white people, that white lady has a really big butt!’

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There has been much discussion around the Westernisation of Asian beauty, and that Western colonisation has left its mark on Asian perceptions of beauty to some degree. The paper Occidentalism of Beauty Standards suggests during British imperialism, East-Asian female deities were illustrated in artworks to emphasise their sexuality and golden skin in contrast with ordinary East-Asians features. Also mass media has a habit of focusing on portraying beauty as whiteness.

As editor Leah Donella wrote on beauty, class and colonisation, beauty standards celebrate whiteness and its often embedded in your daily beauty routines and choices such as straightening hair and having cosmetic surgery. She writes that ‘beauty is a facet of power’ and points out beauty movements have encouraged women of colour to appreciate their own individual beauty.

It’s no surprise then that racism is often embedded within beauty standards. You could be treated differently based on the way you look: some see women from Asian backgrounds as attractively ‘exotic’. Some see an Asian woman who looks masculine or androgynous as a turn off or simply not a good enough, feminine Asian woman.

My friends in Singapore are fairly tanned with their skin a few shades darker than mine. That’s usually because Singapore is tropical and sunny all year round whereas where I am in Melbourne it’s much less sunny all year. When I catch up with my friends in Singapore, many of them exclaim along the lines of, ‘Look! Your skin is so pale! Very pretty!’

Each time I hear these comments, it feels like I’m put on a pedestal for the way I look. That I’m worthy because I am a Chinese person who looks like a white person, embodying Western beauty standards which some see as ‘classier’ as I wrote in How I Came To See ‘Whiteness’ As Ordinarily Beautiful.

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You go through different phases and ages in life, and value beauty differently. The growing older process also affects how you look and how you feel, just like the stresses and joys of life as well. At different points in your life, you dress a certain way depending on what fashion you’re into, what feels comfortable or what you can afford.

In a world that prides on looks as markers success and the epitome of beauty, it’s easy to forget about beauty within. The phrase ‘look good, feel good’ isn’t always true. You could look put together by society standards but on the inside you’re going through personal issues or working on improving parts of yourself (or yet to realise these sides of yourself).

You could look attractive to someone but they’ll probably remember you more for the way you treat them and make them feel.

How you define and value beauty affects your self-esteem and relationships around you. Perhaps when you ’feel good, look good’, you’re more likely to feel the most comfortable and confident around others – and especially with yourself.

What makes you beautiful? What feature or trait are you most proud of about yourself?

168 thoughts on “7 Differences Between Asian and Western Beauty Standards

  1. It seems to get harder to like and be satisfied with one’s looks, with each generation. My daughter’s generation, born in the 2000’s, is hyper critical and hyper vigilant of their looks. They check their appearance in mirrors, reflections and selfied- it happens across both Asian and Caucasian divides. If a person feels confident in their looks, others can see that shy, bashful emotion on their face, just as they can see someone who is more at ease with their bodies. If we are talking body parts – I’ve never been happy with my thighs. Not much can be done about their shape, so I have to accept them as is.

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    • That is a great observation, Amanda. It does seem many of us are dissatisfied with our looks, and body checking is a very real thing. It’s one thing to feel confident in your looks, and another thing to be at ease with your body. I do feel like as I get older, I don’t really care how I look, really being happy with what I have – and am. I’d do a minimal beauty routine before going out, juts for a few minutes.

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      • I think the obsessions with perfection in beauty diminishes as we get older. For the few that it develops into a disorder, it seems difficult to shift. Given the funds, they choose cosmetic surgery but it appears not to fix their obsession that moves on to another manifestation. This is sad but thankfully only the minority of folks. i would like to see society being mindful of that minority in terms of the way they interact with them so as not to reinforce their obsessions.

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        • So agree, Amanda. As we get older, we start getting worried about different things, like the little pain in your back and then the future for instance. Obsessing with looks naturally take a backseat and there’s an appreciation for what you have. It is such a good thought you have there, society behind mindful of those who are fixated on their looks. That’s not a mindset you can change overnight, but you can always show them kindness and compassion.

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          • It is just like your kind spirit to offer a practical and positive counter point to the chaotic, disturbances of mindset.
            Being an example and showing compassion and loving kindness creates a positive atmosphere which the other is unable to create for themselves. It is the only way forward with many mental health issues, I think.

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            • You are very kind, Amanda. Thank you. For some positivity is much harder to achieve, be it about their looks, the way they feel or their circumstances. It certainly is a way forward for many of us – to be kind, compassionate and respectful towards each other.

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  2. It seems sad that so many of us are not satisfied with the way we look. I read that in Korea alone, the percentage of both women and men who have cosmetic surgery is frightening. What defines beauty in all cultures is a symmetrical face—something few of us have because our left and right sides of our entire body are not usually exactly the same.

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    • A very good point, Mallee. True that no many of us have a symmetrical face. A lot of the time for many, the non-symmetrical look is very, very subtle. I guess many cultures see a symmetrical face as equated to wholeness. as whole as a perfectly round sphere.

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  3. I was in China and in Japan, and apart from the very different but both very interesting cultures and landscape features what struck me was the beauty of the people. You folks are so good looking! Me being Dutch (a cheese head as other Europeans sometimes call us, because of the Edammer cheese. I hope. 🙂 ) with my milkfarmersdoghair (don’t try to understand), albeit now white, I cannot find pride in my features. But I seem to be good listener and I can make people laugh. Ugly but funny. Hmmm… 🙂

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    • Thanks for sharing your observations, Peter. Beauty is a matter of perception and in the eye of the beholder. I’ve never thought of Europeans or Dutch as cheese heads. That’s a first I’ve heard of. ‘Ugly but funny (presumably very kind)’ sounds much better than ‘Funny but ugly’ 🙂 There’s so much diversity in beauty especially on the outside that often we forget about unseen and unspoken forms of beauty. Like telling a good joke or showing a bit of kindness.

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  4. Being Asian, but having grown up in Western society, I’ve also seen the similarities and differences in beauty standards between both cultures. I’ve noticed the big focus on Asian girls favoring the “kawaii” factor, as you mention, but growing up, I was never interested in striving for that standard (nor did I feel that I could make myself achieve that standard, given that I’m “too Westernized” and my personality just doesn’t fit the mold). Skin tone is a huge standard that I’ve seen not just in Asian and White/Western societies, but also across the board for even black and Latino/Hispanic communities, i.e. the whiter, the “better.” Which is sad, because it dismisses the beauty of those who are tan or darker in skin tone. Ultimately, I think the universal standard of beauty is symmetry and clear, healthy skin, and I especially think it’s more-realistic to strive for healthy skin and a healthy body (pertaining to our body type) rather subscribing to impossible norms. Good food for thought!

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    • It is interesting to hear you aren’t into the ‘kawaii’ fashion growing up. I wasn’t either apart from a short phase of wanting to wear dresses and bright colours. So true that your personality can relate to how you dress and look.

      So agree with with you that we should strive to be healthy on the inside and outside. Health is such an individual thing, like how a certain diet or medication is not for everyone. I think we should start thinking of beauty more universally like you said. Everyone is beautiful in their own way.

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  5. I love the new picture on your blog my friend! I also like that you said people remember how you made them feel, not what they look like. I always try to focus on the beauty within than the outside. Sometimes I wish I was a bit taller but then I realise that could never be. I like my blue eyes and wavy hair. It’s also important to remember that beauty standards and trends change. Centuries ago, being larger was considered beautiful as it meant you were wealthy and had enough to eat. Then somewhere along the way, everybody wanted to be stick thin. Now it seems the Kardashian curves are the way to go. We can never keep up so we might as accept who we are, as we are.

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    • That’s such great observation about beauty my friend! It’s so interesting to know that being larger was popular in the past, and then skinny was popular and now there’s more acceptance of different kinds of bodies. So nice to hear you like your eyes and wavy hair. You do you 😊 I also love the updated blog header ❤

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  6. Great post Mabel. Growing up in Brisbane, my mother would try to get me interested in Chinese girls. As a teenager, I found my caucasian female friends more attractive. As I’ve aged, the person’s race doesn’t matter so much.

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    • Thanks, Gaz. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and also it comes from our hearts too. I share the same sentiments as you. As I’ve grown older, a person’s race or ethnicity doesn’t matter much. It’s the intentions of the other person that matters more to me. Hope you are well, Gaz.

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  7. This is a very interesting topic, I wrote a post about Chinese beauty standards some time ago and it’s one of the most viewed on my blog.

    Wanting to be as white as possible definitely has a long history in China. I’m now reading a classic novel that was written in the 16th century and every time it describes the beauty of a woman, it always mentions how pale and jade-like her skin was (also how slim and willowy her figure was etc etc… so being skinny as a beauty standard is also not new!).

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    • Yes, beauty is such an interesting topic! So many things to talk about from skin colour to make up 😄 That classic novel sounds like it got the history about Chinese beauty right! It’s amazing how these days many in Chinese especially in Asia want to look as white as possible. Forever a trend.

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  8. Mabel, an excellent and erudite article and it is interesting reading this from a European viewpoint! It’s fascinating to read more about the cultural historical trends in beauty in Asia and it shows the long arm of history that these events still has a huge impact on the way beauty is viewed in the area. Your insightful perspective as someone who has lived in both continents adds depth and personal knowledge in this engaging essay. In the west it was also seen as favourable to have paler skin, as only the peasants, poorer, people had a tan from working outside. Now it seems a tan is sought all the time! Personally I do not follow any trends, beauty tips and go for natural all the time … just time to put on some lipstick in the morning and some make-up for certain events. I totally agree with you that:’ You could look attractive to someone but they’ll probably remember you more for the way you treat them and make them feel.’ So true!

    Ps. I’ve just seen Amanda’s comment and how different it seems to have a son born in the 2000s. As a boy he was totally disinterested in body image, clothes etc … I had to chase after him with a comb! There again, all his female friends were preened to perfection and one could tell time and thought had gone into their clothes, appearance. And yes, so so many selfies!

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    • Annika, you are the first person to describe my work as erudite. That is such a compliment. Thank you so much, and thank you so much for your reflection 😊

      Beauty and cultural historical trends often go hand in hand. It’s fascinating how history repeats itself over and over today and echoes in many of our beauty standards and what we value. I really is fascinating how in the West looking tanned is so popular and the tanning products is endless. I’ve never tried fake tanning but it seems fake tan can stain everywhere.

      That is lovely you have a simple beauty routine and feel confident in yourself. A little lipstick can go a long way to making someone look put together. How we put ourselves together and look should be seen more as a form of creativity as opposed to ‘beautiful or not, attractive or not’.

      Amanda’s comment was very interesting, and thank you for reading the comments. Agreed, so, so many selfies these days not to mention so many filters on social media too. Hope you are doing well, Annika 🙂

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  9. I am forever grateful that my mother de-emphasized looks. My sisters and I generally don’t wear makeup. Think of all the money we save!

    But there’s only so much a mom can do when women are constantly bombarded with ads and media that show them happiness means being young, skinny, and insanely fit. Who can help absorbing that message? which eventually becomes, “only the beautiful people deserve to be happy?” (And women, you will need expensive clothes and products to make you attractive and happy!)

    There’s a lot of money in colonial standards of beauty.

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    • That was so great of your mother to de-sensitise emphasis on looks. You aren’t missing out on wearing makeup. Oh yes, there is indeed a lot of money involved in ‘attaining beauty’. Add to that, that beauty is always changing and is the next best thing to achieve.

      ‘Young, skinny and insanely fit’ is never the reality of life.

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  10. “Beauty lies in the eye of the beholder”… I’ve always believed that Mabel. Physical beauty can be enhanced with modern technology but real beauty is skin deep, which we realize as we grow up. All youngsters go through taunts and judgments of their peer group, emerge from the yardsticks of people around them and discover their personalities. If you want to be truly beautiful, you would focus on positive thoughts that bring radiance to your face.

    I like the way you’ve described various parts of the face and skin to share what people think as desirable. I’ve always found eyes as the most powerful, beautiful eyes add a great charm to the face. Thanks for sharing another thought-provoking post.

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    • That is so true, Balroop, that physical beauty can be enhanced with modern technology. These days social media is saturated with filters and the emphasis on staying current with current looks. So agree that to be truly beautiful you focus on positive thoughts about yourself – and also towards others.

      The eyes are what some may say the windows to the soul. Often by looking at someone’s eyes, you get a sense of their mood and how they are feeling. Thank you so much for your wonderful and reflective comment, Balroop. Hope you are well.

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  11. Interesting and thoughtprovoking again, Mabel.! When I grew up, beauty was important when you went out dancing. I was a dancing girl, so I was grateful for being born thin and slim. Too thin according to myself…too little curves. No young woman is ever totally happy with her body, and today it is much worse being young than it was 50 years ago. Too many fake/retouched bodies to look at. For many years I have been happy with my body, it has served me well. Ideals back then in the 70’s were blonde girls and dark men. In later years, tanning has been the rage, leading to melanoma in thousands of people. And, as you say, wrinkled skin, fast ageing. I agree, it used to be seen as low class in the olden days in Sweden as well. Working in the fields versus being rich and not having to be exposed to wind and sun. Times change…

    I recognise much of what you write about the differences in Western and Asian thoughts. My daughter’s best friend is Taiwanwese, so I have learned many things from there – and from students and travels of course. I have noticed how much skin care is important in the Taiwanese – even her brother is a “beauty freak”. They buy extravagant cremes and makeup and there are no blemishes at all on their skins.

    Body structure. We still want to be slim in my part of the world. I want to stay slim as well – but mostly for health and strength. I read about so many diseases coming with obeseness. Something of the first I heard on the subject of me being too slim, was from my Spanish teacher. He told me I would never be popular in Spain – they wanted more sturdy ladies. I guess I would fit in better these days…

    I have always relied on my inner beauty – because that is what is lasting. – Your looks will never last, that is reality. Being kind and helping, compassionate and understanding – that is what I always try to be, and that is what makes me beautiful.

    Thank you for another interesting post, Mabel. And if I may add my own preference in looks – I have always loved the looks of American Indians, Incas, Soux and other tribes. Also Mongolian looks are attractive to my eyes. But most of all I love animals!

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    • It is always such a pleasure to read your comments and thoughts, Ann-Christine. They always make me think. Thank you so much for this insightful reflection. You never fail to impart wisdom and encourage us to think about the bigger picture in lfe.

      That is so interesting to hear you were a dancing girl. Dance is a good way to keep fit and healthy. Sadly these days retouched bodies are so common, just like how filters are so common on social media to ‘enhance’ looks. I do think it’s a fine line between using such tools for creativity and to cover up beauty, but I think many of it use it to look like something they are not.

      It sounds like your daughter’s Taiwanese friend is a great friend for teaching you parts of her world. It’s fascinating how many in Asia use these beauty creams and actually have flawless skin. I’ve had a look at the ingredients of quite a few of these products, and many have ingredients like fragrance which can be sensitive to the skin…Not something I would use right away but yes, really fascinating to see how these creams work on others.

      Staying healthy is always important. Being on the heavier side does come with health problems and it often catches up with you when you’re older. But the same can also be said if you have a slim figure and have an unhealthy diet and lifestyle. Agreed. ‘Looks’ won’t ever be the same and you can’t control. But what you can learn to control is how you feel on the inside and project to the world. Absolutely love how you say you love animals. Animals are beautiful ❤ Hope you are doing well and take care 😊

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  12. I have seen some strikingly beautiful women in many races. Some women only have beauty skin deep, they are vain and brainless. I have met some women who are very plain in looks and have a personality to really impress. Some of our dopey TV shows have women with breast implants and botox lips which make them look like freaks. I find this particularly ugly. Leave your body alone girls, you will pay for playing around with nature when you get older. Some of the Movie and TV stars who have natural beauty have had lip jobs and facelifts and have ruined their natural good looks. Za Za Gabor was berating her plastic surgeon for the dimple in her chin which appeared after one facelift The surgeon informed her that this was her belly button. He then said that if she were not careful the next procedure may have a goatee beard form further down her body

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    • Sounds like you have indeed come across different types of women of all shapes, sizes and personalities, James. I think for some women and really anyone in general, it can be hard to stop once you start changing your looks. You can fall into the cycle of finding something ‘wrong’ with you no many how tiny – the endless cycle of trying to search for perfection and you never really get there.

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  13. Hi Mabel :). Another interesting topic. This would be great discussed over dinner and drinks with a few friends haha.
    Personally, I find beauty in actions. The way somebody walks, maybe the way they speak or listen. I value attentiveness greatly and find it pleasing when somebody can maintain eye contact during conversation or when a casual smile is gifted in passing and the smile involves the eyes. Peoples action for me can create an instant dislike for that person. I know that I am being judgemental, but failing to acknowledge a greeting or turning ones back (like our PM, but don’t get me started) are very unattractive actions.
    As I’ve got older I see beauty in many people regardless of gender or race.
    For myself, I used to think that grey was a very unattractive look – now that I have grey hair and beard, I like to think of it as distinguished. Constantly reevaluating my perceptions :D. Stay safe and warm Mabel. Hugs from hot and steamy Brisbane

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    • Yes, this is an interesting topic which you can talk the night away over food and drinks 😄

      ‘Peoples action for me can create an instant dislike for that person.’ That is very interesting to hear. I think when you interact with someone and their behaviour goes against your values or is hurtful, then you probably won’t gravitate to them at all. The eyes are so very interesting. By looking at someone’s eyes and if you are observant, you get a feel of how the other person is feeling.

      Yes, grey can be a distinguished look. Sleek, even. It’s a colour like any other colour which you can work with 🙂

      You stay safe and warm too, Andy. Enjoy all of your hot and steamy weather over there. It’s way to cold and dry over here 😄

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  14. A very interesting & thought provoking post. It takes pots and pats to make a woman happy about her self and that to me is a waste of time. My 5 ft frame was cause of many regrets but now have learned to live and respect myself.

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  15. Just like in other East and Southeast Asian countries, fair skin is unfortunately still seen as the highest standard of beauty among many Indonesians. From soap to face wash, every product that touches the skin seems to have a variant that is marketed as “whitening”. This is particularly problematic for Indonesia, a very diverse country whose population don’t look homogenous. Many people in the eastern part of the country naturally have a darker skin color, and all these campaigns preferring those with fairer skin certainly have a profoundly negative effect in the Indonesian society.

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    • It is so interesting to hear whiteness is so popular in Indonesia. I remember when I visited Jakarta many years ago, there were people of both fair and darker skin everywhere I went – as you said, the population doesn’t look homogeneous. It’s interesting how many in Asian gravitate towards such fair skin campaigns, and think nothing else about it. I remember many people in Indonesia were so welcoming and helpful when I was there, and that’s what I will remember the place for. Hope you are well, Bama 🙂

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  16. Having lived in Asia (Beijing) for 14 years, this post was very interesting to me.
    I 100% agree that Inner Beauty is what makes us most attractive. TIme and time again, someone who initially looked attractive to me on the outside, but was selfish and unkind on the inside, quickly lost their charm and beauty.

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    • Exactly, looks isn’t everything. At times looks can be deceiving. When someone is selfish and unkind, that usually leaves you reluctant to engage with them. Sounds like you had many memories of Beijing 🙂

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  17. Mable, I found this to be a very well-researched, informative, and thought-provoking post.

    I am not sure that being beautiful is an advantage. My mother was a very attractive woman and, to some extent, relied on her looks. Looking pretty average, I focused on what I could know, experience, create, and accomplish. Relationships are important. For me, that focus led to a very fulfilling and satisfying life.

    At 72, I do care about how I look and try to be healthy and well-groomed. I like my grey hair. Make-up these days is a little blusher and lip gloss. I go for comfortable classic styles and like black with a hit of color, especially shades of blues, dark pinks and reds. More important to me than looks, though, is using my brain every day and staying informed. My family relationships are important to me and I enjoy writing and blogging.

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    • Thank you so much for your kind words and reflective comment, Cheryl. You sure got a good head on your shoulders and it’s admirable you focus on what you can experience, create and accomplish and work on your relationships.

      When you think about it, beauty comes behind all of that. There’s so much more than focusing on ‘looking good’ all of the time. It’s nice to have basic upkeep routine, and even a some makeup can be fun. At the end of the day, there’s so much more to enjoy out there. Keep doing what you do, Cheryl. And keep writing and publishing books too 🙂

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  18. Another excellent and well researched topic, Mabel. Adding your own personal experiences with perceptions of beauty really gives this whole piece authenticity. I had heard of some of these Asian beauty standards but honestly, wasn’t sure if some of them were false. Now you have confirmed them to be true.

    It’s very interesting what is perceived as ‘beautiful’ in any one culture and how they differ. It really proves that it’s a learned measurement of beauty rather than an intrinsic one.

    I have become more aware of my own ‘learned’ measurements of beauty as I have aged and with that trying to accept and love what I was born with. So, when you ask that question, it’s hard for me to answer. I think maybe my hair, finally.

    I have learned to put much less emphasis on physical ‘things’ that supposedly define beauty. Natural, mousy hair, and sneakers or flat-heeled boots are part of my appearance now. No dressing for others anymore. Makeup is minimal. Also weight. Sigh. I’m afraid I have a big ‘white lady butt’ compared to a petite Asian woman. LOL. But we come in all sizes and learning that weight is a health issue and not a beauty issue is also a lesson I’m still learning. Learning not to judge others as I have been judged.
    Sorry my comment is sooooo long!!

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    • What a wonderful, thoughtful comment, Lisa. Thank you for taking the time to read and leave your thoughts. There are certainly typical Asian beauty standards. Sometimes they hold true, sometimes not. It also does depend on the individual person and what they consitute as ‘beautiful’.

      I think you are spot on in saying that what we see as beauty is learned and shaped by our experiences from a young age. As we get older, beauty is still shaped by our experiences – and also more so by the realities of life especially what we can and can’t change about ourselves.

      It is great to hear that you are proud of who you are and know your style. That is so true, that weight is a health issue. It’s not something people should be pointing out and making judgements about as for all you know, it’s a serious health issue and not everyone is comfortable discussing that. Hope you don’t get judged anymore and if you do, it’s not your fault and it says so much more about the others around you. Take care, Lisa ❤

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  19. I would like to say that I don’t attach a great deal of importance to looks, but of course that’s not really true, Mabel. I do think too much emphasis is placed upon them and it’s not easy to avoid the various expectations if you are young. Older folk have generally learnt to be comfortable in their own skin.

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  20. Some good comments to add to your article, M! Anyway, I’m wondering what provoked to you write about this topic?

    Since I’ve watched so many YT videos on Asian makeup tips (I’m just fascinated, and try to learn a little, but I’m not makeup obsessed and wear little), I can see how much Asians from China, and S. Korea, etc, have learned to master makeup to alter and enhance their features. It’s such an elevated art form these days that you can change the way you look by just drugstore purchases alone.

    Of course, you could argue, why change yourself, but I think women like to experiment with different looks and want to look their best. So yes, we have beauty standards depending on where we live, etc, but man, these days, you have so many options to reinvent yourself — daily!

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    • I’ve read about beauty standards for a long time…and I just thought why not write about it now. Haven’t covered it on my blog so why not 😀

      When I was younger I watched a lot of makeup YouTube videos. That’s so true even with drugstore makeup, you can alter your features quite considerably – and you can indeed reinvent yourself daily. It can take quite a bit of time if you are going for a certain look – and want to apply the look correctly so it will stay on right for the whole day 😄

      Liked by 1 person

  21. This is a good article, Mabel. It’s an interesting topic that you’ve explained well.

    I’m old enough that I’ve been through many changes in what’s considered fashionably beautiful. I can remember when hair must be tightly curled and neat. Then it had to be puffy. To have straight hair hanging down in a natural way would have been considered strange and ugly.

    I think wealth and social status has a lot to do with standards of beauty, even historical social status. The Philippines, where we lived for about 20 years is an interesting example. If you look at Filipino movie stars and beauty queens, they are usually of mixed heritage–Spanish, Chinese, and Filipino (Malay). The Spanish, who were the land owners and the colonial rulers of the Philippines for 300 years, were white and European looking. The Chinese, who were the shop keepers, bankers and factory owners were southern Chinese from Fujian Province. They were light skinned but darker than the Spanish. The Filipinos who worked the land were shorter and darker (naturally and also because of sun exposure). So based on historical social status, it’s logical that Filipinos would prefer light skin.

    In the United States, both the dark skin of African slaves and the very white skin of the poor Irish who came escaping famine and poverty in Ireland might have encouraged Americans to prefer a skin color that is light but not too light.

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    • Thanks, Nicki. This is an interesting topic indeed and thought it was time I covered it. It sounds like you’ve seen and experienced different beauty standards throughout the year. Growing up I remember many of my Chinese relatives loved a good puffy hair perm and I couldn’t understand why. Looking back, I think it was equated to class – that having a perm means you could afford to get your hair done. As you said, wealth and social status has a lot to do with beauty standards.

      It is interesting to hear the colonisation and history of The Philippines, and how fair skin back in the day influenced how people wanted to look – and still today fair skin is preferred there. I do note some Europeans have lesser than fair skin though.

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  22. Hi Mabel, thanks for your post – it made me think about the values of our societies and how we (as Asians) have been brought up to define those values. I think one of the jarring views is that Asians define beauty by what Westerners perceive as beautiful (inferiority complex), while Western cultures define beauty by their own standards which are then disseminated to the world. I am still hopeful that I will be able to see the day we learn to accept our own beauty and uniqueness.

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    • Thank you so much for reading and commenting, Jolene. That is so true that often Asians turn to what’s beautiful as how its perceived in Western cultures – and I think that translates into how many Asians are enamoured by the people and architecture of the West. I too hope one day we can appreciate our individual beauty that we have. Hope you are doing well and stay safe.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Mabel,
    This is such an interesting topic. How are see ourselves has a huge impact on who we think we can be. From my experience, my looks were very important to me in my 20’s sometimes leading to obsessive exercise and eating routines. Now, I don’t have much interest in trying to look a certain way. I am drawn to what I can learn, create and experience. I wonder how this is for other women as they age.
    I always learn something from your posts. Keep exploring the world.

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    • That is amazing you have come to appreciate your looks and yourself for who you are, Ali. What you learn, create and experience often resonate through how you carry yourself – and in essence, how you look. So when you’re in line with what you do and do with kindness and intentions, that’s probably the best look 🙂 Thank you for your kind words and you keep exploring the world too.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. What a detailed, interesting post, Mabel. I have always believed that beauty runs much deeper than the physical appearance. Eyes and smiles usually grab my attention. And I agree with you that if we feel good about ourselves, that feeling will project in our behavior with others. Confidence should be worn on the sleeve, but not to be confused with arrogance. Unfortunately, we live in a culture where thin means beautiful, so many girls struggle with body image as they grow up and begin to develop. And these days, social media makes it much harder to ignore. Everyone is beautiful in their own way, and that is the beauty of our world. If someone is beautiful in heart and soul, that’s the bottom line, what truly matters. Now that I’m in my sixties, I don’t worry as much. I want to look and feel good for me and I want to be healthy so that my hubby and I can enjoy another three decades together. As we get older, we become more serious about health because morality becomes clearer as we climb the ladder of decades. 🙂
    Thanks for sharing this comprehensive post.
    ~Lauren

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    • What a lovely, thoughtful comment, Lauren. Agree with you there with your points. When we feel good about ourselves with good intentions, we often project that on to others – such as if we look after ourselves and health, we are more likely to be kind and think of the best for others.

      Being healthy is one of the things you truly cherish as you get older. Things like having the latest look or clothes or being the popular doesn’t matter. So long as you are healthy and appreciate what you’ve got, that goes a long way towards being truly happy. Hope you are well, Lauren 🙂

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  25. Mabel as always when I visit your blog I am left reflecting on the topic. I had not given a lot of thought to the difference in ‘beauty’ or the quest for it in different cultures. i had no idea about the double eyelid or that there was plastic surgery to attain it. Thinking about the want of pale skin I assume that a benefit would be a lower incidence of skin cancer. Perhaps done for a superficial reason with a side health benefit.
    Your question about what your readers might see as beautiful about themselves is an interesting query. Now over 60 I can’t say i put a lot of thought into looking ‘beautiful’. I do think exuding kindness and warmth is a beauty of the heart and as I have aged that has been far more important to me. I do try to stay fit and healthy and take care of this body. I may not be keen on the wrinkles especially, nothing like a grandchild tracing the lines of a wrinkle to make you realize they are there. Yet how fortunate I am to be alive and have lived so many beautiful adventures.

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    • What a thoughtful comment from you, Sue. You said it very well with some who want pale skin, that they desire that for a superficial reason which incidentally comes with a side health benefit. It’s fascinating how some people go to cosmetic lengths to achieve certain looks – there must be a deep desire and patience within them to get the look they want.

      It sounds like you appreciate the way you look and even more so the wonderful experiences and adventures of life. Amazing. And it sounds like that has gotten you far and doing what you love, travelling around the world, and also spending time with family. Hats off to you and I look forward to following along more with your journey 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. What an interesting article, Mabel! When I lived in Cairo, I noticed many skin whitening products as fairness was desired. In the UK, women go to ridiculous lengths to get a deep tan that doesn’t suit their coloring. In Latin America, people with indigenous looks (more native than Caucasian) are sometimes looked down on. For years I thought I looked a bit strange – a mix of ethnicities – but I have become accustomed to my image. My mental illness gives me a little body dysmorphia so sometimes I really don’t like what I see in the mirror but it is just a symptom. When I am happy, everything is fine.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Kerry. Beauty is always such an interesting topic. We all approach the subject differently. There’s a similar sentiment here in Australia too, that if you are Indigenous or look like you look the slightest bit non-white, you’re looked down upon.

      That’s very nice of you to share how your mental illness gave you body dysmorphia. Good to hear you are able to manage it. Some people probably take a long time to come to recognise this within them and come out on top.

      Keep being happy as much as possible, Kerry. You’re lovely to chat to 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Mabel. I take medication for my mental illness that helps tremendously but coping skills do too. On a side note, my eye doctor is Vietnamese. She and I have some eye issues that relate to the shape and fold of the eyelid. I have 5% Native and 1% Chinese/Vietnamese DNA.

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        • Good to hear you know what works for you to be you, Kerry. We’re all different, look different, and manage our lives differently – and so should respect each other as they are. That’s great you share some small similarity with your eye doctor. You can chat and chat stories with her 😀

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for stopping by. Every society has its values and are unique in its own way. Looks like you do great work with your tours in Tanzania, and you got a great team there. Keep up the good work.

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  27. Fascinating, Mabel. I hadn’t thought about some of the aspects of beauty that you mention. I don’t even know what you mean by double eyelids. I like to think I can see beauty in everyone. I think it comes from an inner glow. I love it when I see people smiling, talking and laughing together, sharing stories. Happiness can be contagious, especially when we are included. I laughed when you said about people with big feet having difficulty buying shoes. My feet are broad. I’m a Queenslander. I grew up without shoes, running barefoot everywhere. Now it is really difficult to buy a pair of shoes that are comfortable. I think my favourite part of your post was in the conclusion when you talked about inner beauty. That’s what counts for me, and hopefully not just because I don’t meet anyone’s definition of (external) beauty.

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  28. An intriguing post, Mabel. I think that few people especially women are totally content with their body shape especially. I was always taunted as a teenager because I was tall and thin. No matter what I ate, I could not add curves to my body. As I grew older, I realised how fortunate I was not to have to worry about putting in weight. I think each culture has its own idea of beauty. I’m quite happy with myself although I really would have loved to have thick, wavy hair instead of straight and skinny hair. 😅

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  29. I think an “ideal look” is a comfortable look. Don’t change because someone else said so. In my case, I couldn’t make myself wear black like my classmates. I went to class, not to a cult meeting 🙂 Also, beauty standards change over time, depending on what group you belong to. I have seen Asian people who intentionally got tanned, just to be exotic in the eyes of their lovers.

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    • That is so well said, Len – an ideal look is a comfortable look. When you feel comfortable, you’d look comfortable. You got a great sense of humour there. True that sometimes black can be associated with cult groups and societies. When you’re comfortable with who you are, that usually is what attracts others to you 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Hello Mabel. This is a high quality post. As a man I can only to say that every woman is beautiful in her own way. In my country young men appreciate only the visible side of the woman and forget the spiritual side. Sigh!
    Happy weekend. Matti

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    • You are very kind. Every woman is beautiful in her own way, and really every person is beautiful in their own way. So don’t forget that you are beautiful too. Maybe one day young men in your country will learn to appreciate what is truly beautiful.

      Thank you for your nice words, Matti. Hope you have a good week ahead 🙂

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  31. Glad you name how racism and colonialism affect beauty standards! I feel like I try to disinvest from physical beauty generally and focus more on internal self-worth, given how beauty is often a product of forces of societal oppression such as fatphobia, patriarchy, etc. Also curious about your use of the word “Caucasian” and made me think of this article and how I’ve eliminated that word from my vocabulary over the past few years: https://med.umn.edu/news-events/time-phase-out-caucasian

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    • Yes, focusing on internal self-worth should be the way to go and glad you recognise that, Thomas. How we perceive beauty is in deed a product of so many class, wealth and societal issues – as we move forward i this world. there seems to be so much more focus on image.

      Thanks so much for sharing that article. I’ve been pondering about the use Caucasian, and also the term Asian – they are indeed umbrella terms, very broad terms. I hope to address this at some point, either on here or in my book. Hope you are well, Thomas.

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  32. Well written, as always. Though for a country person like me, looks are secondary to what’s inside. In the balance of things, isn’t that what really matters?

    As for Asian standards, they remind me very much of Geisha days! It’s like not much has changed since that time. Still trying to please men instead of asking what pleases the woman, herself. Sounds slavish to me. At the end of life, one might well feel cheated.

    For what it’s worth!
    Love you, Mabel! 🌈🙏💓

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  33. Very funny about that big butt creating a hot bus seat. 😀 That’s very Chinese –the bluntness of the remark..in Mandarin. Maybe you ought to do a blog post about colloquial Chinese…how frank, sometimes rude, ribald/sexual or just cursing..the conversation can be. But then, I was raised by parents from rural villages in mainland China. Maybe middle to upper class folks are different 😀 I’ve heard alot of colourful comments and jokes.

    Got off topic. You didn’t touch about Asian women dyeing their hair any other colour except for black. I realize black hair might be boring to some Asians..and they must dye it blonde which honest, it just gets really OLD now that tactic which ruins the texture of the hair anyway. So hair dyeing black hair to the point of damage is …beauty colonization that’s not a good result.

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  34. Thank you for this post Mabel, it made me think about how beauty standards can be so limiting because every person has their own beauty that only they can bring into the world. I think it’s really beautiful when someone radiates compassion and joy. Or when seeing someone smile in their eyes!

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    • Thank you for reading, Katie. You said it well, that beauty standards can be so limiting. I agree it’s such a lovely thing when you see someone’s eyes smiling. It’s beautiful when someone is happy and can be their own selves. Hope you are well, Katie.

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  35. I do believe that each and every one of us are born with our individual beauty where we don’t have to satisfy the standards that society has set for us. You know, like how some Asian folks would go under the knife to change their features in their pursuit of beauty?

    Pardon me if I’m wrong on this, but I’ve also heard that females who have voluptuous figure (especially on their bottoms) are able to have kids. 😅

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    • That’s so well said, that each of us are born with our individual beauty. It seems so common for many Asian folks to go under the knife for cosmetic reasons. These procedures usually cost a fair bit and also you have to take care of yourself after the procedures. But I suppose if that’s what someone wants to do, then okay. Each to their own.

      I’ve also heard that females with voluptuous figures are able to have kids. I haven’t heard that too often these days, so maybe that is not entirely true. Hope you are doing well 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Fantastic post, Mabel. I love it. I enjoyed learning about so many things from it.
    I wondered about the kawali look (of course, I didn’t know it was called kawaii).
    It was just that everyone looked like a sweet little doll. Sadly, I love color but find
    that black is my go to color. I can add any accessory and it matches perfectly.
    I wore uniforms all through school. When I started going to college and could wear
    anything I wanted I was confused. I didn’t know fashion or colors and I found it time
    consuming. With a uniform, you jst dress and go. All the things you’ve listed are
    thought-provoking. Keep up the great posts and writing your book …
    Have a good weekend … Isadora 😎

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    • That is quite an accurate description of the kawaii look, sweet little doll. Lovely to hear you know that the colour black works for you. I’d guess if that’s the colour you mainly wear, you won’t have much issue picking out what to wear for the day, only accessories to worry about 😄

      I agree with your thoughts on uniform – dress and go. Sometimes when I find a piece of clothing that fits very well and in a colour that’s flattering on me, and I wear it often, I might get a second.

      Thank you for your kind words, Isadora. I hope you had a good weekend, and have a good week ahead 😊

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  37. Fascinating post, Mabel! I found many of your observations interesting & found myself nodding in agreement many times. You are absolutely right about Singaporeans preferring fairer skin tones although we are rather tanned ourselves.

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    • Thanks, Ju-Lyn. It’s so interesting how many in Singapore prefer fair skin. The tropical weather over there contributes to more tanned skin. When I lived in Singapore, I was definitely much tanner compared to now. Hope you are doing well.

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  38. This is a very intriguing post, because of all the different definitions of beauty around the world, so this is a tremendous post for piecing together how diverse such ‘definitions’ can be ~ and I wonder how and why these perceptions change over time? I can take three different areas where I have lived: Pacific Northwest in the USA, Hong Kong, and Czech… and how one defines beauty is so different in each place. I never really thought about it until reading this post of yours today 🙂 Whether it is body type, “Thin vs. Athletic” or fashion “Designer vs. Grunge vs. Outdoorsy” or any of the ones you mention above, there are distinct trends (and fortunately I find them all perfect!). It makes you wonder what is behind it? The cynic in me guesses it is all modern analysis of data related to marketing & business, but I do think there is probably a lot of cultural vibes that create the illusions of what is considered the perfect standard of beauty. Great post, great writing, Mabel. Wishing you well and hope you enjoy your weekend.

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    • Thanks, Randall. You raised some very insightful points there. It’s such a good thought, why does perceptions of beauty change over time. Maybe as you said it’s got something to do with marketing and business, or wanting to stand out, a certain trends embodied by certain influential people, a subconscious thing, and more. That’s quite a few places you lived…and that doesn’t include the places where you’ve traveled to briefly 😉

      The perfect standard of beauty is an illusion, especially when we’re talking about one’s outer image. I do think many of us can work on what’s inside of us and bring out inner beauty, showing more kindness to each other. Hope you had a good weekend, and have a good week ahead 🙂

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  39. Hello Mabel
    Well done with this post on a very interesting topic
    I can see the desire for this high cheekbones in the West and clicked on the Alyaka link you added – and was not surprised to see that S Korean beauty products are up here in the US by 300%!
    My son was just telling me how men in s Korea use beauty products more than American men do!

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  40. You are an amazing write, Mabel. Your subject matter is always so well researched and are usually subjects I don’t even think about. What a shame however, that so many women put so much emphasis on outward beauty and not inward beauty. To me the real beauty lies within the heart and how one treats others. Thank you so much for sharing your view on beauty. So much thought went into this post and it certainly shows. I hope to see you writing books. I highly encourage you!!

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    • Thank you so much, Amy. Writing is within me, and it feels powerful. You are so right that beauty is within the heart and that is something all of us have – for some it’s just awaiting to be found. You are very kind, and I do hope to write not one but many, many books. Thank you so much and take care So lovely to hear you recognise Flow as well, Amy. Flow is such a powerful thing. It’s a feeling of being free while letting Love and Mother guide us. It’s an amazing feeling, and glad you know that – and I hope others will begin to feel it some day. The journey has indeed just begun and people are beginning to see the light.

      You enjoy every moment of your well-deserved Spring. The Universe always will have your back . Much love 💖

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mabel, I feel you are in such a good place. I am truly happy for you, for to get to the realm you are living in, you had to have gone through much in order to attain that place. Your writing has become so much richer and expansive and now there is an added ingredient, at least as how I see it. I can “feel” your heart within your words. I can actually “feel” emotion (yours) through your words. That is a powerful gift!! Oh yes you are destined to be a well-known writer, there is no doubt in my mind. None. Flow with who you are and as you have said to me, the Universe always has your back. Much Love to you! xo

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        • You are so kind, Amy. Thank you so much. I am a writer and hope to take my words, and heart, far and wide and inspire others to see the Light. You have a powerful gift too which I feel each time I look at one of your photos. Keep flowing and feeling the love from the Universe. Much love back at you 💖

          Liked by 1 person

        • Things could be much better in the world at the moment – and what’s happening will have a trickle effect all round. It will probably get worse before it gets better.

          We are heading straight into winter here in Australia. I think it will be very interesting to see what’s round the corner. Hope things are stable where you are.

          Liked by 1 person

          • You are right. Wise beyond your years.
            It has to get worse before it gets better. Question is how worse…
            Here? Well. Crime is way up. The local Prez is a dictator in the making. Business as usual. 🙄

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            • I reckon it will get very much worse mid-year before picking up next year. Crime is bad. So ugly. It’s not just about something tangible being taken away from you but also the being violated – and that will live with you. Take care, stay safe and certainly stay sane.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Sane and safe… Quite a challenge…
                And yes, crime is ugly. What is happening in Ukraine is ugly…
                I keep hoping someone somewhere will emerge with a new story, a new hope for the world… But it may take some time…
                Take care too Peng Yu.

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                • It is so, so ugly out there. It will be terrible if things escalate further. Where there is darkness, there tends to be light. So hopefully, that light is just around the corner. And there goes another week. Stay safe and take care, amigo.

                  Liked by 1 person

  41. What a fascinating topic to write about, Mabel! Your article is beautifully written – see? Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder, and I for one like well written posts. 😉
    It’s funny, I have a Chinese friend and her standards of beauty are exactly as you wrote here – to be honest, I was always wondering why we differed so much in our ways of perception what is beautiful and what isn’t. Now I know! 😀 I think around here people want to be tanned as not to appear to spend all their day inside an office – LOL! But it used to be the other way round in earlier ages too, aristocrats also used to be as pale as possible so as not to be confused with peasants working the fields (as if that would have been the case anyway what with the clothes and such).
    I’m fairly pale myself due to having sensitiv skin and using lots of sun protection in summer but would love to be more tanned, hehe!
    I always thought Asian women to be much more beautiful than Western women and find it kind of sad that they want to change their appearance in order to look more like the latter.
    Then there’s the aging thing – big issue here too! No one wants to look their age which I find very troubling. People should learn to be more accepting of wrinkles and additional pounds of weight as they grow older, makes for an easier life. I have an older friend who’s over 70 and is obsessed keeping her figure as slim as when she was a teen. The amount of time she spends working out is amazing! I’d rather spend it reading a book – LOL!
    Wishing you a lovely weekend! ❤

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    • So kind of you to stop by and read, Sarah. Thank you for your kind words on my writing too.

      It’s interesting that there are different ways different people define beauty. What’s beautiful ti someone may totally be not beautiful or acceptable to someone else. Interesting to hear that people over there like to be tanned – and maybe that’s why going out or going to the beach is popular when it’s summer 😀

      Hope you don’t get too much sunburn in the summer! Sensitive skin needs to be taken care of carefully. I also have sensitive skin and when I spend too long in the sunshine, my skin gets itchy. I even have to be careful of which sunsreen I use as some can only aggravate my sensitive skin 😀

      Yes, aging is an thing and it bothers so many people. Most of us probably are affected by aging in one way or another, on the inside and outside. It’s something we all got to learn and accept in our own time. Your older friend sounds like she is motivated to keep in good health, good on her! And good on for your wanting to read a book!

      Wishing you a lovely week ❤

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  42. I’m so late in reading this – apologies. Time away was necessary, but the good news is that I’m back and reading this fascinating (and in some ways horrifying) post. Beauty – ah, there’s the rub. Isn’t it interesting that men don’t have to go through this – double eyelids (??? I confess, I never heard of this before), plumped up lips, makeup, dieting to be super slender, liposuction and more. Oh my, how very very sad. My hope is that we can raise girls (and boys) to value the beauty of the Soul, of the inner being, and accept each of our physical attributes as positives, not negatives. Thanks for this informative post, Mabel. You always make me think! (And that’s a good thing…)

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  43. Ultimately, beauty really is in the eyes of the beholder. I have observed that in recent years, Asians are getting more attarcted to smaller eyes, thanks to the popularity of KPop and KDramas. But our anmation characters still mostly have big, usually-blue eyes.

    As for myself, …I used to not like my small nose. Over time, I’ve come to not just appreciate it but to really like it. I don’t care what anyone else says — I think it’s cute. I have also always liked my brown complexion, not too dark but not too light. Not to say that lighter or darker don’t look nice. I just happen to like the color God gave me.

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    • That is a great observation, that perhaps Asians are getting attracted to smaller eyes – and maybe really seeing much beauty in being Asian in such a Westernised world.

      Yes you love what you have! It’s such a wonderful thing when you accept and appreciate what you have. At the end of the day, there are so many more important things than how we look. And you know it ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  44. A very detailed and informative article, Mabel. I learned a great deal. I found the sun exposure and keeping the skin from being tanned quite interesting. I think I might have mentioned my daughter in New Zealand has a partner of Chinese descent. I have a beautiful 15 month grandson through them. My grandson loves to spend time outside. His dad really stresses to my daughter that it is very important to keep him covered. Always wears a big wide brimmed hat. Which is a very good thing because I understand with the thickness of the ozone over New Zealand, people get burned really easy. Thank you for sharing, Mabel. 🌞

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    • Thank you for your kind words, Carl. Always great to hear about your family, and lovely to hear about your grandson. Sounds like he is an adventurous one. Good to hear his dad keeps him protected from the sun. It’s so easy to get sunburnt this part of the world – and getting sunburnt is not a pleasant experience now or later. Hope you are doing well and looking forward to catching up with your blog 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  45. When I was younger I was very fair but after many years living in California and returning to the Philippines, my relatives were commenting how tan I was. I did not understand at the time because I was 11 years old. Also I was an ocean away where I did not understand the Filipina beauty standards. Maybe it was a good thing I was completely oblivious and I continued to live my life. I’m sure if I stayed, I’d probably be on a skin whitening regime.

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    • It sounded like your relatives were fascinated by how tanned you were back then. It’s funny how many in Asia really are into fair skin. If you aren’t fair, they might give you tips on becoming fairer – as you mentioned, you’d probably be convinced to be on a skin whitening regime. Taking care of your skin and looks (e.g. avoiding getting sun burnt) over looking a certain way should be considered more important.

      Like

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